At what point in the interview did you realize that you were not getting the job?

Updated on : December 3, 2021 by Aisha Brown



At what point in the interview did you realize that you were not getting the job?

He was twenty years old, a mere twig of a man.

I moved to Seattle with my girlfriend when I was 19 years old. She was 18 years old.

We were going to try. Work hard and be independent. We were grown up with a bloody revenge.

We lived in rent-controlled housing in Denny Triangle, a stone's throw from where Amazon now builds its towers, monuments to contemporary capitalism. He's a sucker now, but there was a time, my friends, when he was absolute shit.

We both got jobs at Westlake Center, a downtown mall. I was selling high-end maternity clothes to the wives of the Seahawks players. I was in the basement, I know

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He was twenty years old, a mere twig of a man.

I moved to Seattle with my girlfriend when I was 19 years old. She was 18 years old.

We were going to try. Work hard and be independent. We were grown up with a bloody revenge.

We lived in rent-controlled housing in Denny Triangle, a stone's throw from where Amazon now builds its towers, monuments to contemporary capitalism. He's a sucker now, but there was a time, my friends, when he was absolute shit.

We both got jobs at Westlake Center, a downtown mall. I was selling high-end maternity clothes to the wives of the Seahawks players. He was in the basement, selling novelty T-shirts to tourists who had a few dollars to spare.

I was "moonlighting" like a monkey on a lawn team. Digging in the mud of Lake Sammamish, installing adult rhododendrons for rich people. Coming home to my girl looking like she just spent the day soaking myself in mud at the spa, fully clothed. Tracking mud in the lobby, elevators, hallway, and in our studio apartment. I'd spend thirty minutes taking a hot shower and then get up in the morning to fold T-shirts for the tourists one more time.

Life was hell, and all he knew was that he needed an office job, where he didn't have to wear mud boots or a shirt that said, "We don't tan in Seattle, we rust."

Searching the newspapers for job openings in Seattle was difficult. This was before Craigslist or online job posting sites. Everything was analog, honey, all the time. He grabbed a newspaper and highlighted the jobs he had enough experience to apply for with a yellow marker, courtesy of Sharpie, Inc. He called his landline and made an appointment. If you've been lucky, you'll hear from them sometime in the next three weeks.

There was a law firm in town that needed someone to basically make Xerox copies of documents all day. Stand up, wear dress shoes, and Xerox for eight hours a day.

My interview was with a young boy, probably in his twenties. After talking for a while, he screwed up his face and looked at me with the most intense look of disbelief and skepticism I'd ever seen. He looked at me like I was literally crazy.

"Why, again, might you ever want this job?"

I was stumped. No one had ever asked me that.

"It's work, right?" I said, fearing that I had made a serious mistake in the interview.

He didn't "want" the job. I just wanted to get out of the damn rain and mud. I was tired of washing the dirt off my butt. I was tired of footprints following me to the door of my studio apartment in some shitty housing project.

I didn't realize he was young, strong, not bad-looking, educated, articulate, intelligent, and full of promise and potential. I should have headed for bigger and better things, and this guy saw it.

The world was my oyster, and I was trying to get into a concert by copying documents all day.

Why didn't I want to do what other people my age did? Serving as a waiter, being a waiter or barista, finding a job at a university. This was a job for middle-aged immigrants who couldn't speak English. Get out, have fun, live life.

I didn't get the job. The guy was absolutely right. And if I could, I'd like to meet him and shake his hand. He probably has no idea, but by refusing to hire me he made my day, and maybe even my life.

There have been some interviews that I knew I was not going to get at the time I intervened with the interviewer. I was fired from my job at the start of Covid. A week later he was in an interview. The guy intervened asked how much I wanted, I replied with a low number for my title, which was $ 15 (the hour), he said it was fine, we will call you if we choose you. I looked at it as WTF, and asked, am I done? He answered yes.

Second, I spoke with the billing manager about my experience and where I got my license and education. And I told him everything I needed on the phone. All the time she w

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There have been some interviews that I knew I was not going to get at the time I intervened with the interviewer. I was fired from my job at the start of Covid. A week later he was in an interview. The guy intervened asked how much I wanted, I replied with a low number for my title, which was $ 15 (the hour), he said it was fine, we will call you if we choose you. I looked at it as WTF, and asked, am I done? He answered yes.

Second, I spoke with the billing manager about my experience and where I got my license and education. And I told him everything I needed on the phone. The whole time she was like OMG, this is great, schedule the in-person interview for later that afternoon, step in with her and two other people. She flatly asks me 'why do you think they haven't hired you yet? a lot of knowledge of the field in question, you just haven't put yourself in a position to use that knowledge. 'And of course, I knew at the time that I would never get this energy level position again. The other two interviewers were very impressed with my resume, knowledge and we connected very well. And I even saw one of them write a Yes at the top of my resume.

Third, (during Covid) I schedule the interview and have investigated the company. Feeling quite confident, I walked into the office, not a single person wearing a mask, and they were all in very close contact with each other. One of the women was constantly coughing while I filled out the paperwork. Every time he coughed, he silently thanked me for bringing hand sanitizer. Then, I go downstairs and behold, the lady who coughs takes me to her office. We are no more than 2 feet apart from each other. I was not scared at first, because I expected that at that moment she would put on a mask. NO! She keeps coughing. And I stopped one of my answers and asked him if he needed water. She said 'oh no, I'm fine, I had surgery yesterday so my throat hurts.' In my head I was screaming 'WEAR A MASK! You could have contracted a virus (not even Covid), during your surgery. Keep your co-workers safe! 'I finished my answer and looked over his shoulder and saw a two-screen system, (their screens were on and on a program), I wasn't even trying to try to read anything on the screens, and I said' oh great, you work on a two-screen system, which makes the job a lot easier, she turned around, saw her screens on, turned them off, looked at me and said, really ?!, and then asked a question that was simply asked to make me feel like I was not finishing the interview because I saw their screens, again I was not trying to read the patient information, only commented on the two screen system.

I am still looking for work, at this point I am not only looking for medical billing and coding jobs, but also factory jobs (which I worked for 10 years before billing and coding.

When I was interviewing for a job with Ernst & Young (a few years ago) and I was meeting my interviewer for breakfast at a restaurant in Palo Alto. I told the host of the restaurant my name and who I expected to meet. The host knew my interviewer, no wonder if you think about it: I am not the only interviewee and it is up to the interviewer to use a familiar environment.

When my interviewer arrived, the restaurant host pointed it out to me and pointed my way. I said hello, the host nodded. The interviewer passed me and introduced himself to a white gentleman at the next table, who had been taking care of his

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When I was interviewing for a job with Ernst & Young (a few years ago) and I was meeting my interviewer for breakfast at a restaurant in Palo Alto. I told the host of the restaurant my name and who I expected to meet. The host knew my interviewer, no wonder if you think about it: I am not the only interviewee and it is up to the interviewer to use a familiar environment.

When my interviewer arrived, the restaurant host pointed it out to me and pointed my way. I said hello, the host nodded. The interviewer walked past me and introduced himself to a white gentleman at the next table, who had been minding his own business… The host of the restaurant shrugged.

I was disappointed but not surprised as I don't sound like an African American on the phone at all. However, I also realized that with the interviewer making such a big mistake at the beginning of the interview, that no amount of time or exposure and nothing about the content or quality of my accomplishments or character would be enough to sell me for that opening. . I felt a little bad that these people were taking the time to interview me for a job that didn't have the slightest chance of getting an ice cube if it didn't seem like the type / type of person they were looking for, despite of how I present on paper. They could check the box indicating that they had interviewed me and move on.

I don't think what I experienced represents what Ernst & Young is striving for now as an organization. However, organizations are made up of people, and the people I met that day are the ones I would have had to work with at the time, and it was clear that at least one of them was not even curious as to whether I could help or why that. the team sells and completes more successful engagements, at least not at first.

Roger Revell stated, in his answer to this question, that if there is a point where the interviewee / interviewee "disconnects", that is the point where he knows that he will not get the job. My reality was, and I imagine it continues to be the case for some, that the interview was never connected in the first place for reasons that I cannot control or overcome in a time frame that would make success rewarding for me and the hiring company. . It doesn't matter what they have announced about "diversity." Diversity has always meant for me to focus on common ground and common goals that allow me to work with anyone, at any time, and at the same time realize that not everyone wants to work with me at any given time, for Some reason. who are generally not professionals,

I had to remain anonymous for this because I am still on a stealth job search which is unfortunately taking longer than I expected. This is the backstory because it explains why the rejection was so painful.

I interviewed for a job with an agency where I wanted to work for more than 6 years. It is in another state and would require a massive relocation which I am MORE BEFORE completing, but I don't want to be unemployed and looking. I have followed their cases, examined positions taken at press conferences, and stalked their mentions in job forums.

I have applied to the 4 jobs that have arisen for which

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I had to remain anonymous for this because I am still on a stealth job search which is unfortunately taking longer than I expected. This is the backstory because it explains why the rejection was so painful.

I interviewed for a job with an agency where I wanted to work for more than 6 years. It is in another state and would require a massive relocation which I am MORE BEFORE completing, but I don't want to be unemployed and looking. I have followed their cases, examined positions taken at press conferences, and stalked their mentions in job forums.

I have applied to the 4 jobs that have emerged for which I was marginally qualified in the last two years and have continued to work as hard as I can in my current job to develop transferable skills.

I got a call two months ago about an application that I had submitted two months earlier. He had assumed he would not hear from them and was ecstatic.

The interview was a week away and the woman I spoke to said it was an initial interview, that it would only be 30 minutes and that they only had x number of spaces left (I can't remember the exact number now). I accepted a space for the early afternoon and immediately booked a flight to enter two hours before the interview and leave two hours after the interview.

**** None of the former is really relevant, but it was a backstory for my answer ****

The second in charge of the division, and the only man in the interview, never made eye contact with me and I could feel that he was fully attentive to my presence. It seemed like he was daydreaming. About sleeping.

At that point, I rationalized that perhaps I had had a great lunch.

That's when I really knew.

The older person in the interview asked me "if I was going to visit my family on this trip." I had already made it clear that I was only in town for the interview, although they didn't know how accurate my answer was. I wish I had gone to see my family, but the only interviews available were Tuesdays and Wednesdays and I couldn't take that much time off from work. She felt sorry for me. Oh God. I guess it will be a deferred / dead dream ... we'll see. I'm not giving up, but I may have to.

I guess the only bottom line here is: don't take a night cross-country bus flight before an interview and try to make up for a lack of sleep with Red Bull. You will find yourself weird and it will be a complete waste of time.

I realized that I did not get the job the moment my interviewer told me that I was not going to get the job, and I am grateful for that.

I had been working on a client's site as a vendor for just over a year, and a Human Resources Generalist position was opened in one of the departments I supported. I had been considering a human resources generalist position as a possible career change and arranged a meeting with the director of human resources.

We had a wonderful conversation. He already knew many of the managers he would be supporting, knew quite a few employees in the department, and was intimately familiar with the organization. In short, I was a gr

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I realized that I did not get the job the moment my interviewer told me that I was not going to get the job, and I am grateful for that.

I had been working on a client's site as a vendor for just over a year, and a Human Resources Generalist position was opened in one of the departments I supported. I had been considering a human resources generalist position as a possible career change and arranged a meeting with the director of human resources.

We had a wonderful conversation. He already knew many of the managers he would be supporting, knew quite a few employees in the department, and was intimately familiar with the organization. In short, it fit the bill perfectly. On paper.

Our conversation centered on what I had been doing so far in my career. Everything he had learned. What was my career path like at this time. What I loved about what I did. What I did not love. She really left no stone unturned.

At the end of the conversation, he recommended that I meet with the vice president of human resources, but only so that I could get to know him better. She was not going to recommend me for the role.

I was stunned. We had 90 minutes of conversation and I thought things were going very well. It turned out, she did too. But he also realized that this would not be a role that he would enjoy, it would limit my scope lower than what I was currently doing, and he thought that I would be unhappy and leave quickly.

After giving some thought to the conversation and the new things I had learned about the department, I realized that he was right.

I am so grateful that he helped me see beyond what would have been an "easy" role for me. The next role that I ended up assuming, instead, was one that challenged me, made me learn, forced me to grow as a person and as a professional.

It was an interview with a public relations and communications company that I wanted to work for from the first time I heard about them. It's funny that I left his office that afternoon feeling confident. Only a few weeks after the interview I realized that there were several red flags that led to rejection.

First, I walked into his office and asked for the hiring manager whose name I couldn't remember, as the girl I spoke to the day before did not say her name clearly. One of her employees rolled her eyes and said sarcastically that there was no employee by that name. She immediately made me wait in th

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It was an interview with a public relations and communications company that I wanted to work for from the first time I heard about them. It's funny that I left his office that afternoon feeling confident. Only a few weeks after the interview I realized that there were several red flags that led to rejection.

First, I walked into his office and asked for the hiring manager whose name I couldn't remember, as the girl I spoke to the day before did not say her name clearly. One of her employees rolled her eyes and said sarcastically that there was no employee by that name. He immediately made me wait in his living room for ten minutes.

I was interviewed by the director of the company and the manager of social networks. First we analyze the notions: tell me about yourself, how was your previous company, what were your responsibilities, etc. Then, as I was answering each and every question thrown at me, I realized that the social media manager seemed so disinterested. Absolutely. It was the first clue that I have no chance of bagging the job.

The second clue occurred when the director asked me what I knew about his signature. So I dropped what I read on the page about your company's website, listing some of your services and clients; and he mentioned the cities where they have international offices. He corrected me with one of the cities I mentioned, saying they don't have an office there. Boom. Roast. However, he congratulated me on doing my research well.

The selfless social media manager asked me to define the communication. So I said that it is a two-way street, we learn by listening and interacting with each other, as such. After my response, the manager asked me if I had any questions for him. I just asked him about his company culture, the goals set for the position, and what his management style is. He tried to sound enthusiastic when answering my questions.

The third and final clue that he was not going to get the job was when the director said this at the end of the interview: “We are still interviewing other candidates. We are looking for someone who has the same personality as the account he will handle. "

I received the rejection email five days later. Rather than go the "Sorry to inform you" route, the director softened the blow by saying that they were still interviewing other candidates but then admired my professionalism.

In short, I knew I wasn't going to get the job the moment my interview started. First one of the managers seemed disinterested, then the director corrected my mistake and finally mentioned that they are looking for a candidate with a personality similar to the image of their client.

Oh good. I guess it was destined for better things.

After graduating from college in 1999, I began my job search and attended dozens of interviews over the next several months. I had graduated with a Finance degree with a strong GPA, but didn't have much practical experience at the time. A couple of interviews from that time come to mind.

I interviewed at a large investment firm with an H / R representative who was probably the same age as me (22) or a little younger. I remember thinking that everything was going well and he asked me about my goals for the future. I made reference to the movie "The Secret of My Success", where Michael J. Fox begins his c

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After graduating from college in 1999, I began my job search and attended dozens of interviews over the next several months. I had graduated with a Finance degree with a strong GPA, but didn't have much practical experience at the time. A couple of interviews from that time come to mind.

I interviewed at a large investment firm with an H / R representative who was probably the same age as me (22) or a little younger. I remember thinking that everything was going well and he asked me about my goals for the future. I made reference to the movie "The Secret of My Success," where Michael J. Fox begins his career in the mailroom and works his way through the company. I told her that this was the path I would like to take and she stared at me blankly. Obviously, she had never seen the movie and had no idea what it was talking about.

I remember another interview that was conducted through a headhunting firm. It was with Anderson Consulting (remember this predates Enron). It was an interview at the end of the afternoon and I thought I did very well. I had arrived early (I had looked up the address the day before) and was wearing my traditional interview outfit. I felt comfortable and at ease and felt that it was one of my strongest interviews. I was able to answer all the H / R representative's questions and ask smart questions about the role. After the interview was over and I was walking away quite confidently, I turned around to see the interviewer walking in the opposite direction and noticed that she was shaking her head. Apparently it hadn't been as impressive as I thought!

It's strange that these happened over 20 years ago and I still remember them very vividly. I have not had many interviews since this period and fortunately I do not plan to do any in the future.

At what point in the interview did you realize that you were not getting the job?

I arrived early for a job interview and learned that the person who had the interview ahead had gotten lost, had made calls, and was late. One aspect of the job involved finding locations, PRE GPS and PRE Smart Phone, and punctuality. The interview seemed to go very well. What had happened was that two guys had decided to get into the espresso business, in the Pacific Northwest, at the right time, and they had a lot of money, provided by family and investors and the plan was to open a number of espresso shops. to

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At what point in the interview did you realize that you were not getting the job?

I arrived early for a job interview and learned that the person who had the interview ahead had gotten lost, had made calls, and was late. One aspect of the job involved finding locations, PRE GPS and PRE Smart Phone, and punctuality. The interview seemed to go very well. What had happened was that two guys had decided to get into the espresso business, in the Pacific Northwest, at the right time, and they had a lot of money, provided by family and investors and the plan was to open a number of espresso shops. at the same time. They needed someone who could manage multiple stores, stock them, do hiring, payroll, etc., and continually search for locations for expansion. They had a lot of money to invest in this. The interview went quite well and we shook hands and went out,

Burningly sexy, in a dress inappropriate even for most nightclubs, reaching middle age but still looking good, the woman smiled at them. They fell on themselves. The close engagement and handshake changed to "let me know."

The business?

Flash in a pan is a great description.

I guess this was the period where the guys were still fucking and the sexual harassment lawsuits were about to start.

I just interviewed a major pharmaceutical company a few weeks ago after obtaining my degree. Due to the COVID pandemic, it was scheduled to be in Microsoft's Team Viewer. To the bottom I am used to Zoom due to the online classes and I have never used Team Viewer before.

Since this was a position that I really wanted, I wanted to make sure I looked my best. I got dressed, sat in front of my laptop, and turned on the camera app to check. I REALLY wanted to make sure everything was okay.

The time came and I clicked on the link to access the meeting room. Someone was already there! Problem wa

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I just interviewed a major pharmaceutical company a few weeks ago after obtaining my degree. Due to the COVID pandemic, it was scheduled to be in Microsoft's Team Viewer. To the bottom I am used to Zoom due to the online classes and I have never used Team Viewer before.

Since this was a position that I really wanted, I wanted to make sure I looked my best. I got dressed, sat in front of my laptop, and turned on the camera app to check. I REALLY wanted to make sure everything was okay.

The time came and I clicked on the link to access the meeting room. Someone was already there! The problem was ... I couldn't see myself. My camera was blank. What the hell is going on? The camera app worked, the webcam LED light was glowing. That??? I apologized to my interviewer, Ray, and he said it was okay ... The other interviewer, Jennifer, showed up. I still can't fix my camera. Still getting error on TV "camera could not be accessed" or something like that. The interviewer continued as usual (as can be, considering they can't see me). They seemed to take turns asking questions from a list.

When the end of the interview came, Ray seemed really distracted and needed Jennifer to give him a hint to ask the next question and all that. Then came "Do you have any questions?" part. I asked a lot about work, the environment, API or biologics manufacturing, etc., and Jennifer asked about me. Ray ... he seemed disinterested. I still haven't received an email for a second round of interviews hahaha.

So TL; DR

The camera wasn't working, so the interviewers couldn't see me. An interviewer seemed very disinterested, the face was not so happy from the beginning and he needed a little help asking questions for the interview. Another interviewer was very attractive. Holistically, I don't think I did so well both in the presentation (non-existent camera) and in the interview process (just graduated from college, with hardly any work experience and very nervous).

FYI, I found out what caused my camera to not work in Team Viewer. My camera app was still open. When Team Viewer tried to use it, there was a conflict and Team Viewer could not access the camera. This was on Windows 10. As I understand it, Mac OS does not have this problem. If application A is using a camera, and then you open application B, which also needs the camera, the camera for application A will be turned off and B will be able to use it ... Why can't Microsoft do the same?

I applied for a job that I was most qualified for. It was something that he was excited to have the opportunity to do.

The problem was that I was already working, and in the place where I worked, even taking an hour off was impossible on the schedule. The new company, if they had offered me the position, would have given me almost 6 months' notice and more than enough time for my current workplace to find and train a replacement.

As part of the hiring process, I had to complete a stack of tests online. To my delight, I made the list short. They set a date and time for a 1 on 1 interview. AWESOME. You bet

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I applied for a job that I was most qualified for. It was something that he was excited to have the opportunity to do.

The problem was that I was already working, and in the place where I worked, even taking an hour off was impossible on the schedule. The new company, if they had offered me the position, would have given me almost 6 months' notice and more than enough time for my current workplace to find and train a replacement.

As part of the hiring process, I had to complete a stack of tests online. To my delight, I made the list short. They set a date and time for an individualized interview. GREAT. It gets better, it's only a 20 minute drive down the road. It's a bit far from my job, but it's okay. I tell my boss that I will be late and stay behind to make up time. So if I'm 1 hour late for work, I'll stay late that night 1 hour to make up.

It's 20 minutes away, so I'm leaving to arrive about 1 hour early, so I can easily find parking. I don't know what happened that day, but the traffic didn't move. I ended up being late. When I arrived, it turned out that it was not a 1 to 1 interview. I have to redo ALL the tests that I did online, in a classroom with many others. There are no problems….

I do one, I think it's over, no. Second test. I think it's over, no. break and another test. Then, they tell me that I have to wait an hour or so, and lo and behold, they tell me that I passed, and my interview space would be in about another hour.
Right now, I have coworkers calling me, they need help. I have the boss calling me "where are you". Now I am 5 hours late for work and I am thinking of going back to work 5 hours, or maybe 2 hours a day for several days to catch up on the workload. As you can imagine, I am frustrated and in a rush.

Finally I enter the interview, one of them was warm and friendly, the other on his face I could see this clear and utter disgust. I sat down and the interviewers pointed to a sheet of paper and said "these are the questions you have to answer, think about it for a minute, then you will have to answer."

The questions were simple ... but the questions weren't necessarily the test. The test was: can you stay still for 10 minutes? That was the test. I've missed most of the workday, I'm under pressure, so after a few minutes, we looked into each other's eyes and I said, "I'm ready."

No problem. After a pause, one of them puts down her pen and gives me her full attention. What should I do??

So looking for one that, I mean, one has dropped everything and given me full attention, the other man is looking at me. So after a long discussion, I started answering the questions. One by one.

I got to the fourth question and the man yelled angrily: “NO. NO, you do not answer the questions. We have to ask you first! "

Then he did something again. Just ignoring me like I was shit in his shoe. The other interviewer went back to what he was doing.

He knew that anything beyond that point was a sham. Nothing I said or did mattered. And that's why I had to wait so many hours for my interview. For every person they had before me, they had been made to sit still for 10 minutes, keeping everyone else in the waiting room waiting longer while the interviewers did whatever it was they were doing.

I would never have introduced myself if I had known they were going to waste my time. They booked the space as a 1 to 1 interview. They never said they would waste the entire day. Sometimes I wonder if I could have taken the whole day off. If I hadn't been stressed. Would I have gotten my dream job or not?

EDIT:

When the interview ended, there was no point in going to work that day. I suffered for a week, falling behind to make up for the hours I had lost.

You knew you weren't getting the job when the person doing the phone screen didn't understand the nature of IT work. Asked about accomplishments and was looking for things like Increase sales by X% or Save the company $ Y

I tried to explain that, in IT support, the problems that people DO NOT HAVE are achievements. I must have put it wrong because she couldn't, or didn't want to, believe that IT did anything but leave a workstation or laptop on her desk and walk away. I thought she must have always had excellent support because it was never visible to her. Also, he probably had n

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You knew you weren't getting the job when the person doing the phone screen didn't understand the nature of IT work. Asked about accomplishments and was looking for things like Increase sales by X% or Save the company $ Y

I tried to explain that, in IT support, the problems that people DO NOT HAVE are achievements. I must have put it wrong because she couldn't, or didn't want to, believe that IT did anything but leave a workstation or laptop on her desk and walk away. I thought she must have always had excellent support because it was never visible to her. Also, you probably had no idea how much server hardware a medium or large company has in the data center.

It is an attitude that I have encountered before, but never so blatant and ignorant. Especially since she is supposed to screen applicants over the phone for this type of job! Hopefully I planted a seed that will lead her to learn more, but I doubt it.

On the other hand, I remember an interview in another company where I thought I was sunk but I wasn't. The conversation took the direction of things he hadn't worked on. One of the guys who interviewed me asked "What do you know?" in an incredulous tone. At the time, I thought there was no chance of getting this concert and it helped me relax a bit. A few days later I was hired as a consultant and the incredulous guy in the interview turned out to be nice.

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