At what point in a job interview do you know that you will not hire this person?

Updated on : December 3, 2021 by Blake Lewis



At what point in a job interview do you know that you will not hire this person?

At what point in a job interview do you know that you will not hire this person?

In the vast majority of cases, at no point during a job interview will I know if I will hire someone or not.

I see many responses here that proudly say they have great intuition and make a decision on the candidate in the first few minutes. However, this is the worst kind of methodology, and studies repeatedly show that such decisions are often driven by bias.

This is why in many larger companies comprehensive processes are put in place to combat this, and you are encouraged not to make a decision early.

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At what point in a job interview do you know that you will not hire this person?

In the vast majority of cases, at no point during a job interview will I know if I will hire someone or not.

I see many responses here that proudly say they have great intuition and make a decision on the candidate in the first few minutes. However, this is the worst kind of methodology, and studies repeatedly show that such decisions are often driven by bias.

That is why many larger companies have complete processes in place to combat this, and you are encouraged not to make a decision in the first few minutes of the interview.

In my case, I have seen time and again that a candidate who would start on shaky ground could turn the interview around once they get over the initial nervousness that each of us might be prone to. Especially if you are really excited about a position.

Also, you have to be humble and remember that each of us is prone to a great deal of prejudice. When I interview a candidate, no matter what frame of mind I am in, I always envision myself in the position of the candidate and realize that I would like to have a fair chance.

After two years of constant interviews, I no longer have the slightest idea of ​​deciding on a candidate during the interview. I'm too busy making sure they do the best they can. And I noticed how my attitude went from being contradictory to being on the side of the candidate. I want them to be successful.

The reason many people make a decision quickly is that they assume that any deviation from their expectations is a problem. But a deviation can have many additional reasons, many of them not even related to the candidate itself:

  • your expectations may not be reasonable;
  • the candidate did not understand your question: many questions are broad and there are multiple ways to approach them;
  • the candidate could have worked in a company with different ways of working. This could skew your answers in a certain way and say more about your current environment than it does about your ability;

Obviously, there are cases where I feel like the candidate just doesn't have enough experience. But you have to evaluate it through many questions, you cannot just assume that you can read minds: people are very complicated. And people are the main asset of your team, always.

And, just to answer the question, that decision is usually made after the interview. Very legitimately. In a conversation with the other interviewers.

Usually immediately

My guts tell me

But even if I am very confident in my burst, I will give the candidate a chance to prove him wrong. I will ask you a lot more questions than usual and give you as many opportunities as possible to make up for this "unfair" judgment.

The vast majority of the time, my gust doesn't change their mind

Once, I decide not to listen to them. The candidate was absolutely perfect. On paper, in the answers he gave, in every angle. All the other interviewers thought it was perfect. Since my gust couldn't explain why I didn't like him, I decided

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Usually immediately

My guts tell me

But even if I am very confident in my burst, I will give the candidate a chance to prove him wrong. I will ask you a lot more questions than usual and give you as many opportunities as possible to make up for this "unfair" judgment.

The vast majority of the time, my gust doesn't change their mind

Once, I decide not to listen to them. The candidate was absolutely perfect. On paper, in the answers he gave, in every angle. All the other interviewers thought it was perfect. Since my burst couldn't explain why I didn't like him, I decided to ignore them and recruit the person. The biggest recruiting mistake I've ever made. I finally understood what my guts were trying to tell me after a few weeks. Fortunately, he decided to resign before his trial period ended.

Since, as I said before, I will give every opportunity to change my first impression and sometimes my guts change my mind ... but if not, I will not recruit the person, no matter how many boxes I check.

Good question, here are some things that are likely to make me turn down a candidate for a job:

Lying. I have been doing this for a long time. I have years of job training just discovering people. To put it bluntly, a good recruiter can smell bullshit from a mile away. Don't beautify, it will look silly and it won't work. Don't get it wrong, it's called lying, and if it's not right away, you will eventually be found out. Information is everywhere.

Another surefire way to get rejected is to not follow directions: if the job offer says something like "To be considered, send

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Good question, here are some things that are likely to make me turn down a candidate for a job:

Lying. I have been doing this for a long time. I have years of job training just discovering people. To put it bluntly, a good recruiter can smell bullshit from a mile away. Don't beautify, it will look silly and it won't work. Don't get it wrong, it's called lying, and if it's not right away, you will eventually be found out. Information is everywhere.

Another sure way to get rejected is to not follow the instructions: if the job offer says something like "To be considered, send your resume and a cover letter." So of course do that. Do not write this where the cover letter goes, "N / A". Don't write this where the cover letter goes, "See resume for details." That is NOT a cover letter. If you can't take 5 minutes to write a few paragraphs explaining why you think you should be interviewed, what would make the company think you're not lazy or unable to follow directions? The cover letter also helps the recruiter get a feel for your written communication skills. We all send emails to work these days. Written communication skills are essential in most jobs. I need to see if you can write. If I didn't care, I wouldn't ask.

Confusing Information: When someone sends me a resume and for dates of employment they provide this: "2017 to 2018" please know this tells me absolutely nothing. From 2017 to 2018 it could be 2 weeks, it could be 2 years, it could be 2 months. Nor can I tell from that whether or not you still work there because we are still in 2018. Use common sense. Please remember that I don't know you. I don't know anything about his life and how long he has been working at his job or if he still works there. Why do I need to know? Because it is important to know if you historically quit your job every 6 months. It is important to understand why you have been laid off in your last 3 jobs. Things like that are important.

Without answering the question: I interviewed a boy last week. I asked him why he ended his job at ABC Company. He responded by telling me how this company sold Cisco equipment and how they were able to sell this Cisco equipment by first learning about it and being able to market it to their customers. Now after the first 3 seconds of your answer, I stopped listening to you because I'm waiting for you to answer my question. So I asked again. I learned he was fired because "the owners decided they didn't want to pay to support me anymore ..." Which translates into he was fired.

Lack of Professionalism - I'm not sure if that's even a word, but it gets the message across. A month ago I interviewed someone on the phone for a job in another state. It really sounded like he was eating during the call. On another occasion, I was doing a phone screen with a guy and I'm 99% sure he leaked while talking to me (yes, he took his phone to the bathroom and peed during the interview). Not long ago, I interviewed a guy and asked him why he wanted to quit his current job, which was walk-in bathtubs. He told me it's because the people he sells to now, “… are between 65 and 90 years old…” I happen to like older people. In fact, I hope to be one day and I have a grandmother that I really like and she is 91 years old. Then yes,

These are just some examples. After 20 years I could describe many different ones. But the common thread that I hope has been demonstrated here is that basically, for the most part, it's just common sense. There is no trick or "trick" to getting the interview and getting the job. The company knows what the company needs. If you do, then you have a chance to get an interview and maybe get the job. If it doesn't, it's probably not suitable for the job and that's fine. Nothing stands in your way of finding the right job for you.

Usually after the first minute.

After having conducted many IT interviews and made many mistakes along the way, we finally found several quick questions that return almost zero false negatives.

Very often, after the first question, we already see that the candidate will probably be rejected. The next 2-3 questions simply support this decision. However, the interview usually lasts another 10 minutes just in case, but so far no comebacks have been seen.

However, our questions still have a high number of false positives, so it often takes an additional 20-30 minutes to make a decision. But

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Usually after the first minute.

After having conducted many IT interviews and made many mistakes along the way, we finally found several quick questions that return almost zero false negatives.

Very often, after the first question, we already see that the candidate will probably be rejected. The next 2-3 questions simply support this decision. However, the interview usually lasts another 10 minutes just in case, but so far no comebacks have been seen.

However, our questions still have a high number of false positives, so it often takes an additional 20-30 minutes to make a decision. But usually, if the candidate was not rejected immediately, it is a very good sign, because then it all comes down to his salary. The amount of answered questions that may be acceptable for someone expecting a $ 10 / hour wage may be totally unacceptable for someone who wants $ 30.

When I interview someone, I try to develop some kind of connection with the candidate to decide if I like this person or not. This usually happens within the first 15 minutes of the interview. However, I would like to reserve my judgment and think it over carefully. This will take a few days.

By reading the resume, I have a mental picture of the candidate, technically in terms of content and possible personality with the writing style. I enter the interview with this in mind. My interview questions focus on

  1. Something in the candidate's area of ​​expertise,
  2. Something in our experience, and
  3. Something that
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When I interview someone, I try to develop some kind of connection with the candidate to decide if I like this person or not. This usually happens within the first 15 minutes of the interview. However, I would like to reserve my judgment and think it over carefully. This will take a few days.

By reading the resume, I have a mental picture of the candidate, technically in terms of content and possible personality with the writing style. I enter the interview with this in mind. My interview questions focus on

  1. Something in the candidate's area of ​​expertise,
  2. Something in our experience, and
  3. Something that we are still exploring but we don't know much about.

I look for more technical precision in the first categories and more rhetoric and logic in the last. I also deduce the personality of the candidate at all times by the way these questions are answered. Most of the time, the candidate's behavior closely matches my preconceptions.

However, to avoid jumping, I would like my judgment to sit for a few days and reevaluate. If I still have my reservations, I would express my opinion to my colleagues / hiring managers.

PS: I made a mistake once. A master's student wanted to do an internship with us. After reading his application and interviewing him, I thought he was a bit arrogant and became closely obsessed with what he learned in school. But at the time we were looking for people, so I said, "heck, let's give it a try." Unfortunately, he was right on both counts and it was a challenge to get him to focus on the goal. The moral of the story is: no matter how desperate you are, it is worth waiting and finding the right person.

As a sales manager, I had to go through a lot of candidates to hire. Fortunately, for the lowest tier as a salesperson, my team used to present only shortlisted candidates. For higher levels like area and territory managers, I used to participate from step 1. Some of my areas of focus were:

  1. Punctuality: if a candidate is late, it is a no-no. I would not even interview the candidate. Unless you've been responsible enough to text the HR coordinator or someone at the time of your late arrival, you're automatically removed from the list.
  2. Appearance: Imagine a candidate walking in with a neglected two-day beard or
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As a sales manager, I had to go through a lot of candidates to hire. Fortunately, for the lowest tier as a salesperson, my team used to present only shortlisted candidates. For higher levels like area and territory managers, I used to participate from step 1. Some of my areas of focus were:

  1. Punctuality: if a candidate is late, it is a no-no. I would not even interview the candidate. Unless you've been responsible enough to text the HR coordinator or someone at the time of your late arrival, you're automatically removed from the list.
  2. Appearance: Imagine a candidate walking in with an unkempt two-day beard or hair in place or shirt tucked in the wrong place. Shoes that are not polished, no ties, or bad body odor are deterrents. For women, going in with lazily tied bows and wearing un-ironed clothes is definitely inconvenient. (Since I worked in marketing and sales, this aspect is very important to me. The candidate will be representing the organization and his attitude would not be here, it would cost us a lot)
  3. Courtesies: Every interviewer expects the candidate to have a pleasant demeanor and a calm personality. Handshakes between the two parties are common - some women may choose not to offer their hand (which is fine), so a pleasant smile is normal.
  4. Behavior: To begin with, I always ask how the candidate is feeling, if he had any problems getting to the place (directions, etc.) and if he would like a glass of water and tea or coffee. Many things can be judged here. A candidate who says no thank you versus a simple one does not give many verbal cues. I once had a candidate who simply answered "thirsty" when asked how he was feeling. Apparently his car didn't start in the morning and he had to rush in time for public transportation to get to the interview on time. The honesty and frankness in the basic answers come through and you have a clear idea of ​​what the candidate is about.
  5. During the interview, there are many ways to judge when a candidate is lying, for example, if he says he is an excellent team leader, ask him to cite an incident in which he applied his skills. Counter question and you will know if he is making up the story or giving you the facts. Another way is to tell your work experiences: anyone who has gone through what is indicated in the CV would know it like the back of their hand.
  6. The candidate asks questions: this is where many of them hesitate. A well-prepared candidate will obviously answer all your queries, but when the tables are turned, they become sad. Saying no here is fatal while asking the standard "what is it like to work here" or "what will my first three months at work be like?" Gives it away. A candidate asking for a bit of clarity on the job structure, company culture, or an ambiguous statement about the job description piques my interest. Genuine candidates would want to know more about the position to get a head start for the next round or perhaps get a bonus point by highlighting something that was missed in the job description.

Personally, I can usually tell in the first 5-10 minutes. Usually I have tried to meet with the person at the reception of our offices so that we can talk informally on the way to my office a little to get to know him before we start. At the same time, I have already started my evaluation. I can see how you look besides sitting very rigid in a chair in front of my desk for one thing. I usually have a fairly standard set of questions that I ask to find out what answers I expect based on my other applicants and my own personal experience. I can throw a

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Personally, I can usually tell in the first 5-10 minutes. Usually I have tried to meet with the person at the reception of our offices so that we can talk informally on the way to my office a little to get to know him before we start. At the same time, I have already started my evaluation. I can see how you look besides sitting very rigid in a chair in front of my desk for one thing. I usually have a fairly standard set of questions that I ask to find out what answers I expect based on my other applicants and my own personal experience. I can include a couple of what-if scenarios. I try to stay away from questions like where do you think you'll be in five years because I think they are mostly bullshit. Most people have no idea where they will be in two years, let alone five. The way I see it, I've already had a chance to look at his resume, do the background checks that I think are necessary, and what I'm really looking forward to face-to-face is his personality. I've said this before, even if you don't have a particular skill that I need or maybe you're not aware of, I can always prepare you on that. If you have a lousy attitude or don't feel like you can work well with a team, it's true that I can work to change that, but it's a lot of work and I have other things I need to do. If I have a really positive feeling towards the individual, I can bring it to the work area, possibly present it to some of the current workers to assess reactions to their interactions. Again, that happens only if I have a very strong feeling that I have already made my hiring decision and that it is positive. Otherwise it's a little Chit Chat. I thank you for your time and let you know that "I am still interviewing candidates, but I will let you know my decision as soon as possible." By the way, that last sentence is more or less the kiss of death.

During an interview, one of the basic questions you ask them is about their employment history.

We have a lot of minors who are still in high school applying to my restaurant, so when they come I don't expect much from a work history as my job is seen as an entry level job that students will apply to for. start. Get out there and at least have something on your resume, or have a summer job or an after school job to get some money to spend.

The first girl I interviewed was a high school student. I asked him if he had had any similar work experience before, or any work experience.

Your answer? "I worked at a pizza

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During an interview, one of the basic questions you ask them is about their employment history.

We have a lot of minors who are still in high school applying to my restaurant, so when they come I don't expect much from a work history as my job is seen as an entry level job that students will apply to for. start. Get out there and at least have something on your resume, or have a summer job or an after school job to get some money to spend.

The first girl I interviewed was a high school student. I asked him if he had had any similar work experience before, or any work experience.

Your answer? “I worked at a pizza stand at a local amusement park. I stop smoking after three days. "

Yes, no ... not someone I love. It was good that she was honest about how long she worked there, but she also told me that she would not be trustworthy if we hired her. That's not good.

  1. When the experience declared in the CV does not coincide with the verbal answers given during the interview
  2. When the person gasps for answers on a topic they are already familiar with (according to CV)
  3. When the person speaks in superlative responses of their contributions or performance.
  4. When you don't acknowledge or give credit to your other teammates who made that task or project successful
  5. When he says he responds without any eye contact and moves his head sideways
  6. When you give "quick" answers before you even complete or hear the question correctly
  7. When the answers lack the depth of the topic, it should at least be ca
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  1. When the experience declared in the CV does not coincide with the verbal answers given during the interview
  2. When the person gasps for answers on a topic they are already familiar with (according to CV)
  3. When the person speaks in superlative responses of their contributions or performance.
  4. When you don't acknowledge or give credit to your other teammates who made that task or project successful
  5. When he says he responds without any eye contact and moves his head sideways
  6. When you give "quick" answers before you even complete or hear the question correctly
  7. When responses lack topic depth, it should at least be calibrated to the person's age
  8. Prefer people to use voice modulation when making important points (emphasizing important words)
  9. Unknown of the latest developments in this field of matter.
  10. When the person smiles unnecessarily during responses !! Must be serious when giving interviews (unless the situation dictates)
  11. You don't recognize the difference between a serious question and a creative question. Each interview should have 15-20% creative questions to test the person's mental abilities. The person has to be frank in stating that they have creativity or cannot think at the time or need time to think and reverse or acknowledge if such a thing can ever happen (hypothetical questions)
  12. When the person has less consideration for the parents
  • They have to ask me to repeat every question I ask.
  • They repeatedly answer a different question than the one I asked, or they don't answer my question.
  • They ramble in an endless answer to a question that required only a few sentences.
  • They talk about planning to leave the position in a couple of years.
  • They cannot provide details on what they have worked on.
  • They respond in vague terms or jargon that they cannot explain in the follow-up.
  • They cannot articulate the problems they have solved and how they solved them.
  • They interrupt or dominate the conversation.
  • They do not share the core values ​​of the company or the
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  • They have to ask me to repeat every question I ask.
  • They repeatedly answer a different question than the one I asked, or they don't answer my question.
  • They ramble in an endless answer to a question that required only a few sentences.
  • They talk about planning to leave the position in a couple of years.
  • They cannot provide details on what they have worked on.
  • They respond in vague terms or jargon that they cannot explain in the follow-up.
  • They cannot articulate the problems they have solved and how they solved them.
  • They interrupt or dominate the conversation.
  • They do not share the core values ​​of the company or the team.

Generally, anything that I envision happening in a meeting (technical or 1: 1) that makes it difficult to work with the person.

When I ask the candidate if he has any questions for me. I usually ask the candidate this question after I have asked all my questions to get a good idea of ​​the candidate. However, if the candidate says no, he doesn't have any questions, then I rarely hire him because I don't think he cares about working for me.

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