As a homeless person, what advice can you give someone to survive on the streets?

Updated on : January 17, 2022 by Harlee Hartman



As a homeless person, what advice can you give someone to survive on the streets?

wow ... that's not a question you'd expect to see.

Maggie really hit a lot of things right and I'll try to get into different things.

First, learn who you are with and what their thinking is. If you are going to be around your homeless companions and use security in numbers and the clan mentality burned into us, you must know who around you is a danger to you and your plans and who can become an ally. The last thing you want to do is trust someone who will happily betray you. There are many types of homeless mentalities and the faster you guess them by talking and observing

Keep reading

wow ... that's not a question you'd expect to see.

Maggie really hit a lot of things right and I'll try to get into different things.

First, learn who you are with and what their thinking is. If you are going to be around your homeless companions and use security in numbers and the clan mentality burned into us, you must know who around you is a danger to you and your plans and who can become an ally. The last thing you want to do is trust someone who will happily betray you. There are many types of homeless mindsets and the faster you discover them by talking and observing, the better.

Learn to survive on your own. Yes, you will have people around you, but it is always a flexible alliance and there are times when you will just want to do things without controlling others and times when you will end up alone. Knowing where to go and what to do is the dividing line between comfort and pain.

Find out the streets of your city. You may think you know they know, but get to know them intimately. Learn where it is and where it is not safe to be. Learn the trespassing signals and how to get around them. Knowing each part of your city will give you the ability not to panic when the going gets tough and you need a place to hang out.

DO NOT irritate the police force. No matter how you feel about them, they are your mouse's cat. You want to do everything you can, even kiss to stay in their grace. Why can you ask? because they will catch you and be on good terms and a good person with them will decide if they will put you in jail or turn a blind eye. If you are an idiot for the police and you screw up, do you really think they will let you walk away easily? no. Always remember that they have their work to do and you must respect their work. Yes, they are your enemy when you're out there, but that doesn't give you the right or reason to dig a hole with them. Respecting their job is catching you and enforcing the law. If they can get you to do something like this “ah, you got me. I thought it was well hidden '(smiles or laughs a little) "
if you are lucky they will be in the mindset of letting you go. Address them as sir or madam and just show respect. They can and will put you in jail and from what I understand, homelessness is much better than jail. They are still human under that uniform, but usually they will understand that you really have no choice but to sleep and keep warm wherever you can. They are not generally cruel bastards, although you can always run into one or two of them.

Going back to the first, try to make a group of friends or at least allies. Safety in numbers is true and you will do much better with a group. It does not mean that you give them your secrets, but they are your only source of knowledge of things on the streets. Without an ally you will have no idea who is who and what not to do. The life of the homeless is still managed and balanced and as much as there are people you want to avoid and not disturb at school, there are people on the streets. Pretty much the only reason I made it through my combined year of homeless time was that I gathered information from others. Things like where the next soup kitchen is, where are there some safe places to spend the night, where a good place to find junk food might be better, and more.

This one may seem a bit strange, but the best way to explain it is by listening to the heartbeat of the streets. It doesn't make a lot of sense, does it? Life without a home will flow and twist like a river and things will happen just like in a school. Listening to the general sentiment of the people around you and the gossip of the day can be extremely valuable and can teach you what not to do. If a homeless man fights with another, you will want to know it and just by listening and paying attention you will. Listen to the pulse and don't go against it. Don't start, just listen and see what the water is like. Difficult to explain this.

wow, this is getting a bit long. I only have a few more

Reputation. If it matters. The only way people know who you are is through what you do. You have to understand that everything you do will be remembered by those around you. You must do a good one or you will be in trouble for the rest of your time. Don't hesitate. There are people on the streets whose way of dealing with it is to be aggressive and try to challenge everyone. Don't hesitate. If you want to fight, don't lose. It's not always a good idea to fight because that guy likely has friends and they will come back and it's not like you can avoid whoever you just took down. Diplomacy and the brain are the key. A good example for me is that there was a guy who always got in my face when I was having a bad day. He would never sway, but he would get big and stand in front of me challenging me to do something. I never back down but I never swayed just using my words saying that I wouldn't fight him. Once he realized that I wouldn't fight him, he stopped trying to piss me off. Not so much did I call it a bluff, but I refused to fall for it. If I backtracked everyone would know I'm a wimp and that they might bother me, and if I sway and lose the same result actually. It really is funny towards the end of my time on the streets that the man became a good friend of mine. I went from trying to get him to fight to supporting me. The same thing happened with many of the others. People came into the life of the homeless and asked me who I was and people who knew me could safely say that I was a nice guy and that I would not betray anyone. Reputation is such an important thing. Once he realized that he would not fight him, He stopped trying to piss me off. Not so much did I call it a bluff, but I refused to fall for it. If I backtracked everyone would know I'm a wimp and that they might bother me, and if I sway and lose the same result actually. It really is funny towards the end of my time on the streets that the man became a good friend of mine. I went from trying to get him to fight to supporting me. The same thing happened with many of the others. People came into the life of the homeless and asked me who I was and people who knew me could safely say that I was a nice guy and that I would not betray anyone. Reputation is such an important thing. Once he realized that I wouldn't fight him, he stopped trying to piss me off. Not so much did I call it a bluff, but I refused to fall for it. If I backed off, everyone would know that I'm a wimp and that they might bother me, and if I swing and lose the same result actually. It really is funny towards the end of my time on the streets that the man became a good friend of mine. I went from trying to get him to fight to supporting me. The same thing happened with many of the others. People came into the life of the homeless and asked me who I was and people who knew me could safely say that I was a nice guy and that I would not betray anyone. Reputation is such an important thing. It really is funny towards the end of my time on the streets that the man became a good friend of mine. I went from trying to get him to fight to supporting me. The same thing happened with many of the others. People came into the life of the homeless and asked me who I was and people who knew me could safely say that I was a nice guy and that I would not betray anyone. Reputation is such an important thing. It really is funny towards the end of my time on the streets that the man became a good friend of mine. I went from trying to get him to fight to supporting me. The same thing happened with many of the others. People came into the life of the homeless and asked me who I was and people who knew me could safely say that I was a nice guy and that I would not betray anyone. Reputation is such an important thing. I went from trying to get him to fight to supporting me. The same thing happened with many of the others. People came into homeless life and asked me who I was and people who knew me could safely say that I was a nice guy and that I wouldn't betray anyone. Reputation is such an important thing. I went from trying to get him to fight to supporting me. The same thing happened with many of the others. People came into the life of the homeless and asked me who I was and people who knew me could safely say that I was a nice guy and that I would not betray anyone. Reputation is such an important thing.

If you are going to be with other people, show your usefulness. It doesn't have to be anything big, but if you show that you are useful to those around you, you will have gained a good position in a group. It can be as simple as walking around town and looking for places to sleep or perhaps discovering the best trash cans behind restaurants for food. Maybe you just know where to find the soup kitchen lists that week and take the time to go and get a few copies to distribute. If you can make it easy for them to survive, you will have friends you can trust as much as you can trust anyone out there. I spent most of my time acting like a scout looking for things and keeping an eye on the police when people do illegal things. The sooner you can accept someone's good wishes, better for you, because if you are accused of something, you will want someone there who can back you up. Back to reputation: P

Sure there are many more and I'm sure if I wanted to spend more time doing this I could add a few more, but I think this is good. This is just a picture of a man's inner experience in a city. Different things will surely happen in different places, but many of these things will remain the same.

I could probably write a series of blog posts on my Homeless Father, and very well in the future, on how to survive on the streets. I learned from the best and it kept me alive. Given the short scope of this platform, I'll cover a few things that are more important.

But first, my credentials:

During the last year without a home, I had several attempts on my life, one by four armed robbers; they wanted nothing more than my backpack. Later, I had a blow in my life because I defeated all four of them and left them bleeding and injured, one of them with his own knife stuck in the head.

Keep reading

I could probably write a series of blog posts on my Homeless Father, and very well in the future, on how to survive on the streets. I learned from the best and it kept me alive. Given the short scope of this platform, I'll cover a few things that are more important.

But first, my credentials:

During the last year without a home, I had several attempts on my life, one by four armed robbers; they wanted nothing more than my backpack. Later, I had a blow in my life because I defeated all four of them and left them bleeding and injured, one of them with his own knife stuck in his thigh. And I am very well known in the area and it is not difficult to find. I survived an incredible case of cellulite on my feet that transferred to the bone and finally became #septic. I have survived many freezing nights. I have survived without food for weeks. I survived attack after attack. They attacked me while I was sleeping. I was robbed while I was sleeping. I woke up with my backpack and my phone missing five different times.

I survived all of this while trying to survive a mental illness where I could pass out for hours and end up God knows where at any moment, and sometimes I've drifted away from things or gotten into things. , and in front of things. I was hit by a car, I fell on the train tracks as a train was approaching, and I fell off the ledges, leading to the last thing I just survived, falling headfirst from a 20 foot ledge and nearly bleeding. .

The first thing I want to address is a rebuttal to another answer I saw that says you shouldn't trust anyone. Nothing can be further from the truth. You cannot and will not survive the streets by isolating yourself and closing yourself off from everyone. There are homeless communities with lots of trustworthy people. Find one of them ... Go there ... Live ...

For those who don't, this is the rule to follow:

Find a person and trust them absolutely.

Everyone else, trust their character and keep them in sight. Someone out of sight can hurt you when you least expect it. If you know someone's character and you get burned, then you must have fallen asleep at the wheel.

It doesn't get any more complicated than that, folks.

Once I thought I had a house, an old woman who took me in, until a week later, shortly after giving her all the money I had for the purchase, she left me outside the building and the guards took me off the property when I arrived. It went outside. She still has my jacket and backpack full of clothes. I guess Feed the Homeless week is over, but I'm ashamed to trust someone who I knew was using heroin.

And it is the same with trusting someone within their roles. If someone works in a soup kitchen, yes, they can trust that they will give them food. You can't trust them to take you when the kitchen closes. You can call the police when you need help. You cannot rely on the police officer to bring you a jacket later when you are off duty. Those are situations you don't want to get into. Oh, and by the way, don't expect just any doctor or nurse in the ER to treat you better than a piece of garbage.

Here is a great lesson to learn, when you find the people you can trust the most, you will realize that they are among other people on the street. There is a code of honor and it is followed; it's called human.

Regardless of all that, the number one rule you could preach is to get a phone, a reliable one, and take care of it, which means protecting it with your life. Homeless person without a phone is a homeless person trapped in chronic homelessness that will never get out of it. You wouldn't believe how many homeless people I have come across whose phone was being held as collateral at a loan or pawn shop because they needed drugs. Unfortunately, those are people who will be stuck there for quite some time.

One of the easiest ways other people on the street, and any bully in general, make money is by stealing cell phones. They will come after him. Find a way to tie it firmly to your wrist at all times, especially while you sleep. You are in greater danger while you sleep, always. Keep that as well as medications or anything else valuable to you on your body, not in a backpack or anywhere else.

This is the next big problem they will encounter: keeping your phone charged.

No company wants you to connect your phone to their jacks. They do not care about the electricity you charge, obviously they will not get much. They just don't want you there. You are trash. Trash. Nothing else.

So how do you fix that? Here's the secret and it may involve a bit of theft. You need to find stores that sell cheap portable charging devices, preferably stores that place them in an easy-to-slide area. Obviously it would be better to buy them but I am talking about necessity here. You need to accumulate as many as you can, at least half a dozen. You will need charging cables and USB squares to go along with them. Many come with the laces, the squares are priceless so grab them when you get them.

Then go to the grocery stores and find outlets within the stores that are not obvious, many of them you will find at the base of the floor displays in the deli area. Find the sockets where you can plug one in and place it to the side where it won't be easily seen. You should plant as many of these as you can throughout the city, so that when you need one, you can take it and replace it with another that has run out.

One thing I'll add is that if you have to stand there and charge your phone, don't push it. Come in, come out. Don't wait for someone to talk to you and hand you over, because then legally you won't be able to go back and try again. Charge a little time and don't show yourself. And by the way, a regular customer who charges his phone would not be invaded.

And I'll end my answer with this, this all sounds like a lot of walking. You're right that is. So my next rule: watch your feet.

Hope all of that helps someone.

- The Homeless Father

so this will be an alternative perspective compared to what many have written:

First of all, if you have just become homeless but still have a job, whatever you do, don't lose it. get a mailing address you can use ASAP. Without a postal address it is very difficult to get a job if you lose your current one and most companies know the addresses of the closest shelters.

If you don't have a job, your first goal should be to get one as quickly as possible as soon as possible and you should make a plan on how to do it and get started right away. you need m

Keep reading

so this will be an alternative perspective compared to what many have written:

First of all, if you have just become homeless but still have a job, whatever you do, don't lose it. get a mailing address you can use ASAP. Without a postal address it is very difficult to get a job if you lose your current one and most companies know the addresses of the closest shelters.

If you don't have a job, your first goal should be to get one as quickly as possible as soon as possible and you should make a plan on how to do it and get started right away. you need money but you don't need quick money. fast money is a trap. It is always a trap. You don't have to rush, in fact, don't rush. Build back slowly and focus on your needs first, that doesn't mean you won't find any pleasure, it will definitely limit the pleasures.

All the ways you can get money quickly are scams or criminal activity, (which are designed to dive so deep into criminal activity, that you have no choice but to continue with it and then get stuck being a criminal or an addict or both ). The most important note about fast money is that it puts you close to people you cannot trust. Some of the other answers would seem to indicate that you can't trust anyone or that you shouldn't trust anyone, but that's not exactly true, you'll find if you avoid people who are obviously untrustworthy, like the plague that people with that you find. or those who are trustworthy because they also avoid the same people. not me personally

Based on all of the above, you need to present the least homeless looking face that you can present to all of you. don't act crazy, don't ask people for money, don't stand in a corner somewhere with a cardboard sign asking for spare change. stay clean, dress clean, boys get ready ... don't shave because it costs too much money but a cheap pair of scissors and mirror go a long way to keeping you from looking like mountaineer jim fresh from the wild on a cheat race and looking his only bath for the year before heading back to the mountains. When you meet people on the street, don't look at your shoes in shame, instead say hello to them. keep doors open when entering a store. This is partly for them: the less homeless you seem,

If you have a job, then you want to be as close to your job as possible. keeping that job is very important. You don't want to get fired for any reason, like being late.

I would try to avoid other homeless people as much as I can. in fact, after hours, you would avoid all people as much as you could. when you're in public you should always have that "I'm not a bum" in front of you

As someone who was homeless, or more accurately, "homeless" on and off for several years in my teens and early 20s, I can say this with certainty. Everyone's circumstances are different and everyone has a reason why they are where they are. Not everyone wants to catch you and getting into every interaction the way they do is a great way to become even more alienated and sink deeper into isolation. I see some advice given here which, although perhaps well intentioned, is bad advice, we all know what the road to hell is paved with and the "Trust no one, stay in yourself" kind of advice.

Keep reading

As someone who was homeless, or more accurately, "homeless" on and off for several years in my teens and early 20s, I can say this with certainty. Everyone's circumstances are different and everyone has a reason why they are where they are. Not everyone wants to catch you and getting into every interaction the way they do is a great way to become even more alienated and sink deeper into isolation. I see some advice given here which, although perhaps well intentioned, is bad advice, we all know what the road to hell is paved with and the "trust no one, stay in yourself" kind of advice will certainly put you on a personal situation. and social hell.
My advice is this, KNOW THE PEOPLE, MAKE people recognize your humanity. If you have to beg to survive, try to stay positive, even if you don't feel positive about it. People end up in bad situations and if you just remember that YOU ARE NOT A "HOMELESS PERSON", you are a bloody PERSON experiencing "homelessness". You'll be better for it.
Be as honest as you can, your personal integrity goes a long way toward not only other people literally surviving or even approaching losses that might have preconceived notions about people in the position of simply not having a building to call home. Look for any available governmental, religious, and ANY other available resources such as food banks, daytime workplaces if you can work, or shelters if they are remotely safe, which very well might not be right now. There are often a LOT more resources available than people know about and you usually need to do a little research, like contacting a salvation army, Catholic charities or any local government agency tasked with assisting with resources for homeless neighbors. Don't let a nonsense of "pride" stop you from using resources to help people in your position to help themselves,
I saw someone else already said this, but DO NOT lose sight of your bag (s)! If there is a paid safe situation, say in a bus station that is really safe, that is an option, if you can find work or you just can't take giant bags with you. Try to avoid pushing shopping carts or anything that ends up alone. Put your mind in a "street mentality" for the long term.
I believe that if you can forge relationships based on mutual respect and truthfulness, mutual help and the desire to get off the street and into a better and safer situation, you CAN do it.
Depending on your situation and location, finding a possible local “Homes, Not Prisons” chapter can be VERY helpful.

-In Love, Respect, Empathy (not sympathy), HOPE and camaraderie,

-Frater Nothing

Well, the first piece of advice would be to trust no one, which is at odds with the "safe in numbers" philosophy that most people would assume. This does not only mean distrusting you, homeless companions, but also distrusting the authorities and that well-dressed person who gives you a sandwich or a bottle of water. The housed people are murdering the homeless with poisoned food and water. It's happening across this nation, not just one person is doing it. It's the "perfect crime", with no connection between the victim and the perpetrators, no way to trace it (and even if there was, I'm not

Keep reading

Well, the first piece of advice would be to trust no one, which is at odds with the "safe in numbers" philosophy that most people would assume. This does not only mean distrusting you, homeless companions, but also distrusting the authorities and that well-dressed person who gives you a sandwich or a bottle of water. The housed people are murdering the homeless with poisoned food and water. It's happening across this nation, not just one person is doing it. It's the "perfect crime," with no connection between the victim and the perpetrators, no way to track it down (and even if there was, I'm not sure anyone would care enough to try).

The second tip would be to store a change of clothes in a plastic bag instead of using everything you have at once. The reason for this is the group of people I refer to as the "geddajob trolls". These are the people who will drench you in hot or cold drinks and yell at you to get a job and scold and belittle you. When it's cold outside and you live outside and you and all of your clothes are soaked, that can have fatal consequences. Having a dry change of clothes to change into can save your life.

The third tip is to learn how to conserve and use your own body heat in cold weather. Newspapers between clothing and skin, plastic bags between newspaper and clothing, and if possible, lipstick or petroleum jelly on all exposed skin.

The fourth tip is to keep moving whenever possible. A moving target is more difficult to pin down. Always do your research and know what escape routes exist from your current location.

The fifth tip is to readjust what you consider to be a haven. A space under a porch, a demonstration shed in a construction supply parking lot, a clump of bushes, a keyless car, anything that offers protection from wind and rain or snow or sleet.

The sixth tip is to readjust what you consider edible food. Food from a dumpster is safer than food people give you these days. But you have to be smart about it. You have to learn to know if it is safe to eat and it is good to have a backup plan in case you make a mistake. It is very helpful to have a bottle of pepto bismol on hand in case of food poisoning. The first sign of food poisoning is a really horrible tasting burp that smells even worse than it tastes. Drink a few pepto slugs after every rotten burp and you have a good chance of preventing other more unpleasant symptoms from developing.

This is just the beginning. If anyone is really homeless and really new to it and needs advice or suggestions, feel free to message me here on Quora or on Facebook. I can't promise anything, but I can help.

I can tell a story or two that relate to the short term, but I doubt it will work forever. This was in the mid-80s when two friends and I would go out for a week at a time with no money and explore the city of Milwaukee.

When we needed a warm place to sleep, we would go to the big apartment buildings and go down to the laundry rooms. They were fairly large apartment units and there was a great deal of space in the basements. It was very rare for someone to come down there in the wee hours of the morning. Many times there were mattresses and blankets and the like in the storage areas.

Keep reading

I can tell a story or two that relate to the short term, but I doubt it will work forever. This was in the mid-80s when two friends and I would go out for a week at a time with no money and explore the city of Milwaukee.

When we needed a warm place to sleep, we would go to the big apartment buildings and go down to the laundry rooms. They were fairly large apartment units and there was a great deal of space in the basements. It was very rare for someone to come down there in the wee hours of the morning. Many times there were mattresses and blankets and the like in the storage areas that we used.

I remember one night it was raining to beat everyone. Greg and I were drenched. I knew of a laundromat that was rarely used after dark. I opened the panel on a dryer and made the dryer think that someone had just put $ 40 worth of credits on it. We undress and dry our clothes, including our shoes. No one came in grateful. The dry and the warm conquers the wet and the cold. I also went into the office a bit and got some sandwiches from the desk. We were hungry.

Food during the day was easy. There were many fast food places around. We just walked in and said that an item from the car order had been forgotten. It worked all the time. There was also a nearby pizza chain that threw away the skeeball tickets intact. We would take them inside for treats.

We'd walk out of the side door of a movie theater and watch a couple of movies on the multiplex for free.

We could ride the buses for free looking for transfer passes that were still valid, or ask someone to get off the bus for theirs.

We met some girls at the skating rink and hung out with them when their friends were at work. We stole alcohol and cigarettes from their parents.

Now, if you notice a pattern of unethical behavior, it is only because the question was asked with the need to "survive." I was 16 at the time and my moral compass was not well developed. I tend to be a very moral person these days and I don't steal things.

Trust no one, ever. Not your friends, not the police, not the person who donates their free time to run a soup kitchen. The only person you can afford to trust is yourself.

If you find an abandoned building to sleep in, stay outside and observe it for several days before setting foot in it. You want to find ways to get in and out where they won't see you. He wants to make sure it's not a place where prostitutes take their gamblers and he wants to make sure there are no drug addicts or dealers plying their trade there. Beware of older neighbors as they are more likely to see you coming and going in a

Keep reading

Trust no one, ever. Not your friends, not the police, not the person who donates their free time to run a soup kitchen. The only person you can afford to trust is yourself.

If you find an abandoned building to sleep in, stay outside and observe it for several days before setting foot in it. You want to find ways to get in and out where they won't see you. He wants to make sure it's not a place where prostitutes take their gamblers and he wants to make sure there are no drug addicts or dealers plying their trade there. Beware of older neighbors, as they are more likely to see you come and go at any time and call the police.

Any food, even sealed cans, can be easily handled. Trust him at your discretion. It's best if people give you money or take you with them when they buy it so you can see that they haven't done anything with it.

If someone gives you an unsolicited drink from a fast food place, DO NOT DRINK IT. People find it fun to buy lemonade and pee before handing it to them.

Try to find an army surplus store. My local sells thick wool blankets for £ 5 and army issued cold weather sleeping bags for £ 10-15. You can even get tents for £ 10–25.

Find a bakery in town and get some exercise when the staff go home. All cakes, sandwiches, and pastries that did not sell that day are bagged in food waste bags and placed in separate bins from normal trash. Help yourself once the store closes. Don't make a mess and this remedy can last a long time.

Water is readily available in the UK as all water from any tap fed from the mains must be potable by law. Get yourself a bottle to store. If it's a cheap bottle of mineral water, change it every few months, as the bottles start to break and you can start to taste the plastic.

Handicap cubicles in public restrooms are great for keeping clean. They always have a sink, soap, and paper towels or dryers. Go first thing in the morning before the stores open so you won't be disturbed.

You will read a lot of responses telling you to join a gym so you can use their showers. It is not that easy in the UK. If you have a job that's fine, but most places charge a membership fee, then a session fee each time you log in. That is too expensive for most homeless people.

Don't be put off by how little money you have. As long as you are willing to eat private label food from the supermarket, £ 1 can provide you with multiple meals.

If you see a lot of homeless people hanging around a random part of town, that's usually where the soup truck stops. Stay and have a hot soup.

Rule number one: everything goes with you in your bag at all times and you never lose sight of it. Preferably never let go. In the UK, the police can't take that bag from you if they move you. That bag is your life and you should do everything you can to keep it safe.

As a former homeless person, here are some tips:

Some people will use all the reasons they can to exploit you for sexual purposes. Be very aware of this and always keep it in the back of your mind and tell very few people that you are homeless.

The police will harass you. Take any summons and fight in court if you can. Never let those who should protect you harass you.

Violence. There is violence in the streets, but it is worse in the shelters. I stayed in a shelter and while I was sleeping I was sexually groped and threatened with death by another woman. In another, I was ridiculed and insulted and degraded

Keep reading

As a former homeless person, here are some tips:

Some people will use all the reasons they can to exploit you for sexual purposes. Be very aware of this and always keep it in the back of your mind and tell very few people that you are homeless.

The police will harass you. Take any summons and fight in court if you can. Never let those who should protect you harass you.

Violence. There is violence in the streets, but it is worse in the shelters. I stayed in a shelter and while I was sleeping I was sexually groped and threatened with death by another woman. In another, I was ridiculed, insulted, and degraded. In another, there was blatant drug use outdoors and physical violence among residents. (Most were church-run or church-run shelters. 2 were state-run). A tent can be a blessing, but it is not safe, especially for a woman. However, I would take a tent any day over whatever homeless shelter I stayed in (only one shelter in 5 was decent and friendly to some degree)

All of this will leave you feeling degraded and even more worthless. Hang in there anyway and constantly strive to improve your life every day. Don't get caught up in trap 22 of the system, and try to ignore audiences who place false narratives and negatively stereotype the homeless. The system is designed to keep you homeless, especially if you have no children or are mentally ill. The system does not help you find a job or improve your life.

And again, always beware of attempts at sexual exploitation.

Someone suggested that you don't trust anyone and I was homeless for a few years so the following is based on my experience: I found other people in the same difficult situation as me and we pooled our money to stay in a hotel room in place to sleep on the street. Homeless people have clicks just like high school teens have clicks. There are so many resources available. Free food, free clothes, showers if you can't raise your money and get a hotel room. You have to be careful with your items, NEVER leave them unattended and be careful with

Keep reading

Someone suggested that you don't trust anyone and I was homeless for a few years so the following is based on my experience: I found other people in the same difficult situation as me and we pooled our money to stay in a hotel room in place to sleep on the street. Homeless people have clicks just like high school teens have clicks. There are so many resources available. Free food, free clothes, showers if you can't raise your money and get a hotel room. You have to be careful with your items, NEVER leave them unattended and be careful who you trust, but you can't just not trust everyone. Once, someone outside of my "homeless family" it's not even funny. Even if the motel is a dump. In Florida, you are not allowed to receive mail if you live in a motel in Osceola County. Some motel managers will allow it, but there are few points in between. Beware of people trying to sell your food stamps. Make a circle of friends that you trust and stick with that group and stay within it. I bought one of those big trimmed things and at night I always fastened my purse to the belt loop of my pants. Trust me when I say that combining your money to rent a room is so superior to sleeping in a homeless shelter, it's not even funny. Even if the motel is a dump. In Florida, you are not allowed to receive mail if you live in a motel in Osceola County. Some motel managers will allow it, but there are few intermediate points. Beware of people trying to sell your food stamps. Make a circle of friends that you trust and stick with that group and stay within it. I bought one of those big trimmed things and at night I always fastened my purse to the belt loop of my pants. Trust me when I say that combining your money to rent a room is so superior to sleeping in a homeless shelter, it's not even funny. Even if the motel is a dump. I bought one of those big trimmed things and at night I always fastened my purse to the belt loop of my pants. Trust me when I say that combining your money to rent a room is so superior to sleeping in a homeless shelter, it's not even funny. Even if the motel is a dump. I bought one of those big trimmed things and at night I always fastened my purse to the belt loop of my pants. Trust me when I say that combining your money to rent a room is so superior to sleeping in a homeless shelter, it's not even funny. Even if the motel is a dump.

Thanks for the A2A.

First, you have to deal with how and why you ended up homeless. Reflect on it and, if possible, work it out so it doesn't happen again. However, there is time that cannot be done.

Second, you must decide what your goals are. Do you have irons on fire that require you to stay in a certain area? If not, why stay? Would you be better off elsewhere? Where and why Do you have the skills and experience to live remotely / out of the country? Once you've defined your needs and goals, make a decision and stick with it.

Third, contact churches or groups like the Salvation Arm.

Keep reading

Thanks for the A2A.

First, you have to deal with how and why you ended up homeless. Reflect on it and, if possible, work it out so it doesn't happen again. However, there is time that cannot be done.

Second, you must decide what your goals are. Do you have irons on fire that require you to stay in a certain area? If not, why stay? Would you be better off elsewhere? Where and why Do you have the skills and experience to live remotely / out of the country? Once you've defined your needs and goals, make a decision and stick with it.

Third, reach out to churches or groups like the Salvation Army and see what resources they may have for you.

Fourth, and this should be the first, stay away from alcohol and drugs. If it's in them, leave it. Addictions will only make things worse.

Fifth, always be kind and polite to everyone you meet. There are exceptions, of course, but for the most part you are better known as the homeless gentleman than the homeless idiot. People help gentlemen much more often than tease.

Sixth, trust is earned. There are some people you trust and some you don't. That cop who offered to help you, some trust is fine, but not much. The preacher who gave you the food, trust is fine, but be very careful what you trust. Use discernment. One thing I found is that some of the homeless people I met were much more trustworthy than the community professionals offering help. Because they're in the same boat as you, and it's not wise to shit on your neighbors' front door, if you know what I mean.

Seventh, pray. I don't care about your religion or lack of it, just pray. Prayer helps, regardless of your deity.

1: find any delivery center in your area

2: Have a cup and thick grocery bags handy for going to the bathroom. A bucket will work if you have a tent. (Most businesses these days don't allow you to use the bathroom unless you're a customer.)

3: find a tent (you don't want to sleep directly on the sidewalk if you can help it)

4: Find a clean sleeping bag and / or mattress. (Make sure to leave the mattress in the sun for a bit before using it)

5: Always have something on hand to protect yourself. Screwdriver, Knife, Sharp Card Stock, Hammer, Taser, Mallet, etc. Anything that can be used for defense.

6: if you have

Keep reading

1: find any delivery center in your area

2: Have a cup and thick grocery bags handy for going to the bathroom. A bucket will work if you have a tent. (Most businesses these days don't allow you to use the bathroom unless you're a customer.)

3: find a tent (you don't want to sleep directly on the sidewalk if you can help it)

4: Find a clean sleeping bag and / or mattress. (Make sure to leave the mattress in the sun for a bit before using it)

5: Always have something on hand to protect yourself. Screwdriver, Knife, Sharp Card Stock, Hammer, Taser, Mallet, etc. Anything that can be used for defense.

6: If you have ID, start recycling as soon as possible.

7: If you don't have an ID, find a center that will help you get one.

8: keep your area clean. You'll be in a better position with the neighborhood if your area doesn't seem like a tweakers' paradise. Also, keeping a clean area prevents the police and sanitation from bothering you.

9: Make sure all the trash you have is put into trash bags in an area where sanitation can pick it up.

10: Make sure to look for allies you can trust on the streets. There is safety in numbers.

11: stay away from hard drugs. Those will keep you on the streets safe. I know the streets are stressful, but drugs will only make things worse.

12: Make sure your tent and other belongings don't block wheelchairs, strollers, and walkers.

And finally

13: don't lose focus on survival.

Other Guides:


GET SPECIAL OFFER FROM OUR PARTNER.