As a computer science student, how do I choose a career? How can I know in advance which career path is the most suitable for me?

Updated on : December 6, 2021 by Louie Mills



As a computer science student, how do I choose a career? How can I know in advance which career path is the most suitable for me?

Now choosing a path in a race is a bit like choosing a path in the forest when you come to a "Y". The most typical choice is between 1) a nice, easy trail that leads to a waterfall, or 2) a rugged hiker-grade thing that goes up the mountain, takes three times as long, but rewards you with a great view and a lot of experience.

Since you are already a student, you have some knowledge about possible career fields. But a "good fit" can come only after you've had a lot more education and learned more about your abilities and limitations.

I love math and science, but I hit the wall in Calcu

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Now choosing a path in a race is a bit like choosing a path in the forest when you come to a "Y". The most typical choice is between 1) a nice, easy trail that leads to a waterfall, or 2) a rugged hiker-grade thing that goes up the mountain, takes three times as long, but rewards you with a great view and a lot of experience.

Since you are already a student, you have some knowledge about possible career fields. But a "good fit" can come only after you've had a lot more education and learned more about your abilities and limitations.

I love math and science, but I have a hard time with calculus. A in algebra because I could conceptualize the formulas in my mind. The calculation required a lot of raw memory for formulas and just relying on them to connect and conform to realities. It shattered my mind - I got a C, then a D in my final course. I realized that he was an artist or a musician; and as much as I like art, I found that drawing figures (naked people, to learn anatomy) disgusted me, and the slides of classical art put me to sleep. Art was something I did for pleasure, not for a living, or at least not in academia. Then the music, which I had avoided, began to emerge with such force that the music in my head became louder than the words of my teachers in the other subjects. I chose for that senior. Upon graduation, my major, what I liked best, Organ Performance, was worth maybe $ 3,000 a year as an organist in a cathedral, a part-time, high-pressure job. I found a little church where I could be free, and I taught piano lessons, eventually becoming a minister, which required a whole new set of people skills (which as a hermit musician I thought I didn't have, but came through using .)

That's just a taste of how career options work. very few people decide on something in high school and stick with it all the time, because life gives you strange cards and because, at various times in your life, you can just change your mind!

Best wishes for your success. Keep your eyes and heart open!

A2A. As a computer science student, how do I choose a career? How can I know in advance which career path is the most suitable for me?

Because CS is a business title, I suggest you look for an area that interests you and see how it works. You will find in your career that you will work in many areas, so if you are working on something that does not fit, you will find something else.

The answers to these questions always make me laugh.

It is easy to assume that almost everyone, especially in wealthy nations, is computer literate. After all, half the world's adults own a smartphone.

However, in 33 rich countries, only 5% of the population have high computer-related skills, and only a third of people can complete tasks of medium complexity.

A recent international research study allows us to quantify the difference between the general population and the tech elite. The data were collected between 2011 and 2015 in 33 countries and were published in 2016 by the OECD (the Organization for

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The answers to these questions always make me laugh.

It is easy to assume that almost everyone, especially in wealthy nations, is computer literate. After all, half the world's adults own a smartphone.

However, in 33 rich countries, only 5% of the population have high computer-related skills, and only a third of people can complete tasks of medium complexity.

A recent international research study allows us to quantify the difference between the general population and the tech elite. The data was collected between 2011 and 2015 in 33 countries and was published in 2016 by the OECD (the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, a club of industrialized countries). In all, 215,942 people were tested, with at least 5,000 participants in most countries.

In total, in OECD countries, 26% of adults were unable to use a computer.

In the United States, only 5% of the population has these high computer skills. In Australia and the United Kingdom, 6% are at this level; in Canada and across northern Europe, the number increases to 7%; Singapore and Japan are even better with a level 3 percentage of 8%.

In general, people with strong technology skills make up between 5 and 8% of the population of their country, regardless of the rich country they come from. Go back to the OECD definition of level 3 skills.

The important thing to remember is that 95% of the population of the United States (93% in Northern Europe; 92% in rich Asia) cannot do these things.

You can do it; 92% –95% of the population cannot.

Now keep in mind that these are not true technical skills. These are what most of us would consider basic skills.

The truth is that roughly 2% of the world's population has the skills to fill the most basic programming vacancies.

Right now, in the US alone, there are 500,000 job openings for programmers.

Bottom Line: If you are a programmer and have moderate skills, you will continue to have a high paying job until you die and there is absolutely nothing on the horizon that shows anything different.

Well, for a Computer Science graduate there are many things you can do. Fortunately, computing has many ways to go to start a decent career. You can be a software developer, software engineer, project management personnel, quality assurance engineer, systems analyst, data science expert, artificial intelligence expert, machine learning (also AI) expert, scientist / researcher, academic in the academic sector and many other things.

However, considering all these things, I would like to categorize this decision making in 3 ways.

Academic research:

If you have very sticky

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Well, for a Computer Science graduate there are many things you can do. Fortunately, computing has many ways to go to start a decent career. You can be a software developer, software engineer, project management personnel, quality assurance engineer, systems analyst, data science expert, artificial intelligence expert, machine learning (also AI) expert, scientist / researcher, academic in the academic sector and many other things.

However, considering all these things, I would like to categorize this decision making in 3 ways.

Academic research:

If you have very good academic results or an excellent CGPA, you are probably interested in going to Teaching or Research in both the academic and corporate sectors. If you are interested in teaching, research, etc., then you should start your higher studies as soon as you graduate. If your CGPA is average / below average but you still want to pursue this career, then you can probably do research work with a good professor for a while at your university and have some good posts. This can be very helpful for admission to reputable universities for further study. Do not hesitate or waste your time if you want to go this way.

Jobs in the software industry:

If you are passionate about software development things, you have to find out for yourself what it is that you like the most. Development tasks can be boring. So unless you love what you do, you won't feel good about your job. If you like business software development, look for good companies around you that work on your preferred technologies. If you prefer mobile app development, look for companies that work on these kinds of things. The same goes for all other technologies and paths. If you don't like core development stuff, then you might like project management, software testing, quality assurance, and many other things. And there are many such roles in companies that you can apply for.

However, the real problem may occur in something else. Since this is your first job, the big mistake you can make may be "Find the job that pays you the most." Trust me on this, never do this. For your first job, always choose the company that allows you to do what you love the most and the best possible opportunity to learn.

There are many practices in Software Development / Engineering that you may think you know, BUT you don't actually know them yet. You may not know how to write good, modular, reusable and testable code, you may not know the best practices of different layers in good product development. You may not know how to work as a team as a good team member. These things are really important to your career.

I have seen many of my friends and young people join some great companies that pay better than others. But, unfortunately, soon your job function is limited to something within an already established product of that company. Over time, many of them become frustrated and cannot survive long. Those who survive eventually move to other managerial roles as time goes on. And many of them have to start from scratch due to a bad choice.

So in short, go for the job you love to do. And think carefully before choosing the right company to help you reach your full potential.

Entrepreneurship:

This is probably the hardest path to take in my opinion. People may differ and I cannot argue because I did not take their path. So, I really don't know their difficulty levels.

However, I will only say why I chose this path in 2013, right after my graduation. I started developing native mobile apps for Android and iOS as a freelancer in 2011 when I was a student. I really loved this job and that moment was the boom time of the mobile app industry. I went to 3 local reputable companies for a job interview in my last semester and got decent job offers from 2 of them. But I wasn't very happy with the role they cast me for. I wanted to be on the mobile platform and I wanted diversity in my jobs. That eventually led to the existence of Dhrubok Infotech Services Ltd. Well, I am not a very successful entrepreneur in my career yet, but when there are discussions of top-tier talents in iOS and Android in Bangladesh, my name is talked about. If the debate is about the major application development companies, the name "Dhrubok" is discussed among some people. Well maybe because Bangladesh is a small country :)

Finally, the path of entrepreneurship is tough and stressful. But you are willing to follow your passion, you want to accept challenges and do something that you take pride in your work, then this is the career path.

I have prioritized 2 things in my career. First of all, I love what I do and second, I take my job very seriously. I think that's really important in someone's career.

You are viewing this as if there is a true path, and in reality, it probably does not exist. Something like True Love (TM). For the record, "The Princess Bride" is one of my favorite movies.

Instead, you have many, many paths. Some great, some tolerable, some stinky.

My first real job as a new Comp Sci graduate was as a technology writer. While in school, he was a central computer operator, a computer class grader, and a busboy at a restaurant. None if that was some kind of "race". After the tech writer job, I had about 4 different types of network administrator (3Com, Vines, Novell, OS

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You are viewing this as if there is a true path, and in reality, it probably does not exist. Something like True Love (TM). For the record, "The Princess Bride" is one of my favorite movies.

Instead, you have many, many paths. Some great, some tolerable, some stinky.

My first real job as a new Comp Sci graduate was as a technology writer. While in school, he was a central computer operator, a computer class rater, and a busboy at a restaurant. None if that was some kind of "race". After the technical writer job, I was about 4 different types of network administrator (3Com, Vines, Novell, OS / 2, Windows), a programmer / analyst, a manager, a systems engineer, various levels of network engineer, a manager again, a security analyst, and a security engineer, in no particular order.

I've worked at three universities, a Defense Department contractor, finance, telecommunications, pharmaceuticals, and non-profit organizations.

I have worked / lived in four cities in three US states, I have moved twice and I have traveled for work for more than a week each, I have worked in California, Canada, France, Spain and Switzerland.

I've had good bosses, bad bosses, great bosses, and complete assholes as bosses. I have been overpaid, underpaid, and paid what the market says I am worth.

I have worked 35 hours a week and I have worked 80 hours a week. I've been involved in layoffs at at least four companies - sometimes I survived, sometimes I walked out the door, and sometimes I had to get people out.

I've had jobs that I loved, others that I hated, others that made someone a ton of money, and others that made a part of the world better in some way. There were times when I wanted to leave, and other times when I couldn't believe that this was my job.

None of these elements, individually, define a career. Very few of these things can be known when you accept your first job. Other life events can dictate your choices, limiting or expanding your options.

Unless you're a Magna Cum Laude at one of the twelve schools, your first job will likely be a foot in the door. It does not define you. There are many doors. It may seem like a good move, or maybe a mistake, but you won't know right away.

My advice is to relax. Lighten up. You know what you like to do and what you are good at.

True Love (TM) can only exist if you follow your own heart.

Costya Perepelitsa has an incredible answer. Seriously, I agree with everything.

I realized about halfway through that this was going to be an incredibly long answer ... there is a tl; dr at the end

Honestly, when I was in high school, I thought the same as you. Why would you want to be a CS Major? I don't want to sit in a cubicle for hours on end. I don't want to have a career where I don't talk to people. But let me tell you ... I was completely wrong about the older one. When I realized how passionate I was about technology and actually gave computing a chance, I learned how amazing computing is as

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Costya Perepelitsa has an incredible answer. Seriously, I agree with everything.

I realized about halfway through that this was going to be an incredibly long answer ... there is a tl; dr at the end

Honestly, when I was in high school, I thought the same as you. Why would you want to be a CS Major? I don't want to sit in a cubicle for hours on end. I don't want to have a career where I don't talk to people. But let me tell you ... I was completely wrong about the older one. When I realized how passionate I was about technology and actually gave computing a chance, I learned how amazing computing is as a specialty, field, and career.

I'm still quite young so I can't "look back" very far ... but I have to say, so far, it's been worth it. As I am young, let me give you a bit of my computer science background (and hopefully talk about my credibility). I have spent quite a bit of time working in the industry through my 2 internships (and 3rd this summer!). I have some research experience (bioinformatics, computational epidemiology, and CS + initial education). I'm still a student so I still have a lot to explore, but from where I am now, I know I have made an amazing decision.

The main point I want to make in this answer is that Computer Science is an incredibly versatile specialization. In all the outreach and recruiting that I do, I preach that. Computer science is a worthwhile specialization and career because you can combine it with just about anything imaginable. I love music, sociology, psychology and education (among other things). Those are all fields that, when combined with computer science, make up some amazing research areas. Even subjects like English, which seems completely opposite to computer science, have interdisciplinary applications (NLP - Natural Language Processing). And it can even work in pure CS! AI, machine learning, computer vision, etc. they are also amazing courses. Then,

Even if you're not looking to do research, take a look at the tech industry in general. The diversity within the industry is enough to tell me that computing is a worthwhile career. Look at how much of our world revolves around or involves some kind of technology. When I do scoping, we ask students "how many computers do you have?" Sometimes they respond with 0, 1 or 2 because they are thinking of laptops or desktops, when in reality items like cell phones, microwaves, cars, televisions, etc. have computers of some kind. This means that if you choose a career in computer science, you will likely never get bored with your job. You could work in a company on projects related to social networks and then move on to another that works on mobile or on the web or in products or data analysis, the possibilities are endless! Even within the same company, there could be teams doing incredibly different work. The example I usually do with students is Microsoft: think of Windows, Microsoft Office, Outlook, XBox, Azure, Windows Phone. They are all so different, but they are all in one company. And, the concepts behind the products (operating systems, productivity, email, games, cloud, mobile devices) are being worked on in different companies. And those aren't even all Microsoft products, nor does Microsoft work on all industry products or concepts. The industry is incredibly diverse and full of options! the concepts behind the products (operating systems, productivity, email, games, cloud, mobile devices) are being worked on in different companies. And those aren't even all Microsoft products, nor does Microsoft work on all industry products or concepts. The industry is incredibly diverse and full of options! the concepts behind the products (operating systems, productivity, email, games, cloud, mobile devices) are being worked on in different companies. And those aren't even all Microsoft products, nor does Microsoft work on all industry products or concepts. The industry is incredibly diverse and full of options! the concepts behind the products (operating systems, productivity, email, games, cloud, mobile devices) are being worked on in different companies. And those aren't even all Microsoft products, nor does Microsoft work on all industry products or concepts. The industry is incredibly diverse and full of options! the concepts behind the products (operating systems, productivity, email, games, cloud, mobile devices) are being worked on in different companies. And those aren't even all Microsoft products, nor does Microsoft work on all industry products or concepts. The industry is incredibly diverse and full of options! the concepts behind the products (operating systems, productivity, email, games, cloud, mobile devices) are being worked on in different companies. And those aren't even all Microsoft products, nor does Microsoft work on all industry products or concepts. The industry is incredibly diverse and full of options! the concepts behind the products (operating systems, productivity, email, games, cloud, mobile devices) are being worked on in different companies. And those aren't even all Microsoft products, nor does Microsoft work on all industry products or concepts. The industry is incredibly diverse and full of options! mobile devices) are being worked on in different companies. And those aren't even all Microsoft products, nor does Microsoft work on all industry products or concepts. The industry is incredibly diverse and full of options! the concepts behind the products (operating systems, productivity, email, games, cloud, mobile devices) are being worked on in different companies. And those aren't even all Microsoft products, nor does Microsoft work on all industry products or concepts. The industry is incredibly diverse and full of options! mobile devices) are being worked on in different companies. And those aren't even all Microsoft products, nor does Microsoft work on all industry products or concepts. The industry is incredibly diverse and full of options! the concepts behind the products (operating systems, productivity, email, games, cloud, mobile devices) are being worked on in different companies. And those aren't even all Microsoft products, nor does Microsoft work on all industry products or concepts. The industry is incredibly diverse and full of options! the concepts behind the products (operating systems, productivity, email, games, cloud, mobile devices) are being worked on in different companies. And those aren't even all Microsoft products, nor does Microsoft work on all industry products or concepts. The industry is incredibly diverse and full of options! the concepts behind the products (operating systems, productivity, email, games, cloud, mobile devices) are being worked on in different companies. And those aren't even all Microsoft products, nor does Microsoft work on all industry products or concepts. The industry is incredibly diverse and full of options!

On a side note ... When I go and talk to students, I tell those who are undecided about which major to choose to choose Computer Science, because almost all majors have to program or work with technology at some point.

Now to address some of the points you've made in your question description ...

I have never sat in a cubicle for 8 hours. The only time I ever sat in a cubicle was when my team moved into a new building and standard company procedure was to install the flooring in cubicles until they were all installed and then they could change it back (needless to say, just was there for a week anyway). There are places where you will work in a cubicle, it just depends. But, there are definitely quite a few companies where you won't sit in a cubicle (unless you want to, and there are definitely cubicle advantages!).

The only reason I have stayed in the office for more than 8 hours is because I wanted to. I know it sounds crazy and my friends (and co-workers) thought I was crazy too. Of the last 2 summers, days longer than 8 hours only occurred during one of them. When you find something that you are passionate about, time flies by. Seriously. Honestly, during one of my internships, I left the office at 6:30 (after dinner nearby) every day. Maybe once in a while at 7:30, but not very often. It has to do with loving what you do. Nobody actually forces you to stare at a computer screen for 8 hours. Even when I was spending more than 8 hours at work, not everything was spent looking at a computer or even code. A good deal of it was spent meeting people, working on white boards, walking to try and solve a problem or error in my code. I guess the point I'm trying to make is that "long hours" are not necessarily a requirement or an expected part of a career in computer science; it's more like something that comes with the territory and loving the product you're working on.

It's beyond exciting to build "cool stuff"! It's crazy to see your code in production. Something as simple as creating a button on a website or changing the location of something can affect hundreds, thousands, millions of people. It is almost difficult to assimilate that. For me, I can't even begin to realize how many people have seen the changes that I made. And I'm not even a great programmer. I'm so young, I haven't done anything. Can you imagine working in this industry for years and years, impacting people throughout the centuries? For example, I'm going to work for the engineer who created the page breaks in Google Forms. How many people create multi-page Google forms? That's crazy. I worked (briefly) with someone who I later learned was (basically) a Facebook giant. I thought it was another engineer from the chat division. I can't even begin to imagine the people he has impacted throughout his career.

Costya referred to the pay. I don't want to waste a lot of time talking about money. Yes, it is quite a lot. It is a good salary. I didn't take any of my internships or research grants for the money (although I'd have a good reason to do so).

It's such a satisfying job. I think the information I've given above illustrates that, but in case it wasn't ... A career in computer science is very satisfying. It is more than satisfactory. I am passionate about helping people, connecting people, working with technology ... Can I do all that for a living and get paid to do it? That is incredible. Even if you didn't get paid, the fact that someone, anyone, has the opportunity to really change the world is incredible. Computer science is one of the specialties that really changes the world. When I think about how much technology has changed and affected society, I realize how important computer science is as a specialty and field.

Can you expect to be hired in your 40s or 50s? I'm not really even close to that age, but I guess I am. If your skills are good, I don't see why not! And there are also people who move in the industry. And, to assure you I'm not kidding, my dad just started working again after fighting and beating cancer (GO DAD!). And he is also a CS-er!

tl; dr: A career in Computer Science is so, so, so, SO incredibly worthwhile.

It depends. I'll break it down as best I can.

Hiring / Jobs

Definitely! This fact can be supported by both historical facts and common sense.

  • Dot-Com Bubble: This Stanford University study showed the number of people who earned their Bachelor's degree in Computer Science. It shows that hiring of IT jobs dropped dramatically. I can assume that this also happened during a recession.
  • Job Growth Scheduling - If you look at the BLS, you can see that the number of schedule jobs will hit a 7% decrease (2016-2026). The REASON developers are losing jobs: Outsourcing. Essentially, programmi
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It depends. I'll break it down as best I can.

Hiring / Jobs

Definitely! This fact can be supported by both historical facts and common sense.

  • Dot-Com Bubble: This Stanford University study showed the number of people who earned their Bachelor's degree in Computer Science. It shows that hiring of IT jobs dropped dramatically. I can assume that this also happened during a recession.
  • Job Growth Scheduling - If you look at the BLS, you can see that the number of schedule jobs will hit a 7% decrease (2016-2026). The REASON developers are losing jobs: Outsourcing. Essentially, programming jobs are shifting to cheaper workers in places like India.
  • ROBOTS- 1) Okay, the most obvious one. Robots will inevitably take over most computing jobs. The second is my own personal theory that terrifies me.
  • 2) Robots will cause a recession bigger than the Great Depression. If you think about it, when companies are replacing humans with robots, they are essentially laying off people who buy their own products (the result may be that they are all poor and there are no more jobs). This continues in the companies they advertise for. (Google-> Zappos). This will cause a recession that will cause the major tech companies to shut down and stop hiring. Okay, this is a perfect segway for my next point.

Technological growth

Yes, there will be technological growth. However, I fear that this technological growth in computing will be overtaken.

  • More Tech Startups: With the success of startups like Yelp and Quora itself, more startups will continue to open. (Yes, this also affects hiring.) These startups will make new revolutions in computing that we have never thought of before. In addition, large companies continue to grow.
  • More computer science graduates - just look at this UNC study. Practically the same reason as the one before this statement.

UNC. "Computer science majors exceed the budget of the department, the faculty." The Daily Tar Heel, computer science majors exceed the budget of the department, the faculty.

  • Wow, this tech growth could have made things worse than it was before, IT COULD. POWER OF THE KEYWORD. Like I said, I have a theory about robots that will do the trick. So by filling in the blanks you will arrive at my final theory that we can go back to something close to our days as cavemen who are just fighting to survive. (However, I hope this doesn't happen.)

Career path for a computer science student - Usually you will start as a junior developer if you only get your bachelor's degree and work for relative slave wages (~ $ 50-60k / year) while learning the business of the software development area you are coding by. You will have many opportunities to move forward if you are good at explaining your ideas in English, not techno-English. You will quickly increase your income, but probably more by changing companies than through promotions and merit increases. You will become a specialist in a business area or a language and that will make your demand even higher, but you will lose

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Career path for a computer science student - Usually you will start as a junior developer if you only get your bachelor's degree and work for relative slave wages (~ $ 50-60k / year) while learning the business of the software development area you are coding by. You will have many opportunities to move forward if you are good at explaining your ideas in English, not techno-English. You will quickly increase your income, but probably more by changing companies than through promotions and merit increases. You will become a specialist in a business area or a language and that will make your demand even higher, but you will lose the ability to expand into new things because you are very specialized and in high demand. You will go back to school to get an MBA or some other master's degree and then go into management or even more in your area of ​​expertise. You'

How did I choose my path? While I was "taking a year off" from my philosophy / psychology studies, I worked for a chemical company doing odd jobs for their instrument calibration department. While I was there, I had the opportunity to do a bit of dBase development and I liked it. So when I went back to school, I switched to computer science and took it so well that some teachers asked me if I needed a job as a technical assistant, but unfortunately it was only a bachelor's degree. So, with a big head and a desire to code, I went out into the world. In short, I did it on a small scale and found it calling me. See if there are any internships for companies that need talent. I have hired a few myself and am generally impressed with their skill level and when I have them for more than a few months I work on their team's development capabilities, improving their coding process to help them write good, robust code. This will show you if you are a passionate developer or if you need to focus on another area such as product management or qa.

The real ideal way to perceive a better career is first to have the basic ingredients of the useful system ...

Lingering on the basics come the basic rules that are applicable most of the time ...

The following is what you get from these, which is the basic experience in the field ...

The theory is different from the practice, but both are two sides of a coin ...

Theory is what has to be applied in practice using basic principles ...

Learning and mastering the basics is a must ...

Then comes the subject of experience, imagine that after gaining years of experience in assembling desks

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The real ideal way to perceive a better career is first to have the basic ingredients of the useful system ...

Lingering on the basics come the basic rules that are applicable most of the time ...

The following is what you get from these, which is the basic experience in the field ...

The theory is different from the practice, but both are two sides of a coin ...

Theory is what has to be applied in practice using basic principles ...

Learning and mastering the basics is a must ...

Then comes the subject of experience, imagine that, after gaining years of experience in assembling desktop PCs and you find yourself in front of a Mac laptop and that it is blocked by some software and you are preferred to handle it ...

Imagine the situation ...

You really need to know everything that pertains to the field and once you master one thing, then if you feel like it is enough, then that moment is to switch or nudge yourself into the other perspective view on the field.

So it is not enough to be proficient in just one thing in the field ...

As we all know, "the known is a drop, the unknown is an ocean" is particularly similar here ...

Never blame anyone for guilt try to respond and not react ...

That is all for now…

Good luck…

Hello,
The truth is that you can choose anything.

For a recent computer science graduate, what companies are looking for are problem solving skills regardless of domain. If you haven't found a field you're passionate about, do what the job requires. Most software development jobs involve a combination of all of these components, so you may be exposed to at least some of them in your workplace.

When you get a job, there are various resources on the web and on Quora itself.
Here's one: How do I prepare for a software engineering job interview?

Regarding the published fields, such as the

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Hello,
The truth is that you can choose anything.

For a recent computer science graduate, what companies are looking for are problem solving skills regardless of domain. If you haven't found a field you're passionate about, do what the job requires. Most software development jobs involve a combination of all of these components, so you may be exposed to at least some of them in your workplace.

When you get a job, there are various resources on the web and on Quora itself.
Here's one: How do I prepare for a software engineering job interview?

As for the published fields, as the other answers mention, each of them is in its own league. All of them are in demand right now and will continue to be in the near future.

1 and 2 are the most accessible jobs, and almost any software engineer job involves a combination of both. The other three, on the other hand, are quite specific. I think it is not very easy to get a job in those fields unless you have some research experience that supports your profile or other important achievements.

Bottom line: Experiment with your jobs until you find a calling. Once you do, you will probably know the route to get there.

Also, if you want to get acquainted with these fields, take some related online courses. See if the problems you find in those are something you would expect to deal with on a daily basis.

All the best !

The answer to this question is

Ek saabhe sab sadhe sab sadhe sab Jaye.

It means that if you practice several things once and not one thing several times in the end, you are not good with any of them and all your effort is wasted.

So decide what is most important to you and do only that thing at a time because, in the end, someone else who did one thing several times will shine on you. I don't want you to go through that, it's very sad.
So start concentrating all your power on just one at a time, be it web design or ai or jdbc or twitter bootstrap .....

Don't try to be a tramp cat

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The answer to this question is

Ek saabhe sab sadhe sab sadhe sab Jaye.

It means that if you practice several things once and not one thing several times in the end, you are not good with any of them and all your effort is wasted.

So decide what is most important to you and do only that thing at a time because, in the end, someone else who did one thing several times will shine on you. I don't want you to go through that, it's very sad.
So start concentrating all your power on just one at a time, be it web design or ai or jdbc or twitter bootstrap .....

Don't try to be a fool. First become a player of a trade, then eventually you will become for everyone.

Don't run after quantity, run after quality.

If you want a productive and successful career, follow this and you will thank me later.

Most of the most important people in the world are not good at all things, but they are the best at one thing they know better than anyone.

You can consult with a professional counselor to select the right path for you in Computer Science. They are experts and have many years of experience in the field of education, so they will be the right person to discuss and receive advice about your career. You can check with CareerPotli for the same, it is one of the top 5 educational technology startups in the country that has mentored over 65,000 students across the country. You can get in touch with them and decide the best career path for you through their scientifically designed and approved way of advising students, which is very effective and beneficial to you.

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You can consult with a professional counselor to select the right path for you in Computer Science. They are experts and have many years of experience in the field of education, so they will be the right person to discuss and receive advice about your career. You can check with CareerPotli for the same, it is one of the top 5 educational technology startups in the country that has mentored over 65,000 students across the country. You can get in touch with them and decide the best career path for you through their scientifically designed and approved way of advising students, which is very effective and beneficial for students. During the interaction session with the career experts, you can clarify your queries, doubts and ask any questions related to education and career directly from the experts and get an answer from them. Getting expert advice for your career will help you decide which one is best for you. So, to identify your top interests, skills, capabilities, and top 5 career paths for you accordingly, you can contact CareerPotli and follow the right career path at the right time.

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