Are programmers at risk of losing their jobs due to automation?

Updated on : December 8, 2021 by Kamari Maynard



Are programmers at risk of losing their jobs due to automation?

In reality, programming and the creative arts (like writing novels or music composition) are the last jobs to be automated, if they ever become automated, of course. These jobs require creative thinking and are therefore different from the more "automatable" jobs that are repetitive in nature.

While it's true that today's AI can compose music, paint a canvas, or write code, it's still based on what humans have done before. Basically, such systems are fed with millions of examples of human endeavors in these fields, and the AI ​​system then regurgitates the output with some modifications of its own (also based on what I

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In reality, programming and the creative arts (like writing novels or music composition) are the last jobs to be automated, if they ever become automated, of course. These jobs require creative thinking and are therefore different from the more "automatable" jobs that are repetitive in nature.

While it's true that today's AI can compose music, paint a canvas, or write code, it's still based on what humans have done before. Basically, such systems feed on millions of examples of human endeavors in these fields, and the AI ​​system then regurgitates the output with some modifications of its own (also based on what it feeds, and NOT its own "thinking").

That being said, all of us, including programmers, must keep an eye out for trends in our industries. Many times, the results of work are acceptable, either by a human or an artificial intelligence system. After all, a lot of IT work through “smart repositioning” of functional requirements can turn into repetitive work. Check out this article on developing software without code:

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So THAT in particular can lead to unemployment. In my estimation, we may be able to witness this on a larger scale some 25-30 years from now.

PS: If AI achieved human skills in programming then it would have achieved General Intelligence. That point will mark the end of humanity.

No, I do not see how it would happen that a large part of the world population lost their jobs due to any technological advance. From what I see, any form of advancement in science brought to us by brilliant minds throughout history has only increased the percentage of the population engaged in some form of work (production or delivery of goods or services) and reduced the number. of people working on the "land". , farms, creating this or that form of food that we eat. The changes in the story quite reflect the changes we see today, the percentages only increase and the number of new jobs and requirements for new workfo

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No, I do not see how it would happen that a large part of the world population lost their jobs due to any technological advance. From what I see, any form of advancement in science brought to us by brilliant minds throughout history has only increased the percentage of the population engaged in some form of work (production or delivery of goods or services) and reduced the number. of people working on the "land". , farms, creating this or that form of food that we eat. The changes in history pretty much mirror the changes we see today, the percentages are only increasing and the number of new jobs and the requirements for the new workforce have only increased.

I was not specific here and said that programmers risk losing their jobs due to automation. I tried to explain that programmers could only lose their TITLE of being programmers and switch to… I don't know… “software developers”? "Software engineers"? "Frontend / backend / fullstack developers"? Anything else?

The title will change, jobs will not be lost unless someone decides to voluntarily remain unemployed.

Not at all.

Programmers have been the leading innovators and promoters of software automation.

The first leap in software automation was the invention of Assembler.

The next step in code automation was "writing code that writes code" by adding a macro processor to the assembler.

The next was to use an interpretive language that provides operations that are not available on native hardware. Adding "floating point interpreter" was the first example of such automation.

This was followed by "high-level languages". FORTRAN and LISP are two of the first automations to use high-level languages.

T

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Not at all.

Programmers have been the leading innovators and promoters of software automation.

The first leap in software automation was the invention of Assembler.

The next step in code automation was "writing code that writes code" by adding a macro processor to the assembler.

The next was to use an interpretive language that provides operations that are not available on native hardware. Adding "floating point interpreter" was the first example of such automation.

This was followed by "high-level languages". FORTRAN and LISP are two of the first automations to use high-level languages.

The FORTRAN compiler was able to generate very good code close to or equal to that of an experienced programmer.

LISP was to provide recursive function evaluation, garbage collection, and symbolic computation. These were only possible thanks to the high level of automation provided in the LISP environment. AI wouldn't be possible with a lot of code automation.

Object-oriented programming is another level of program automation in the program and data structure.

Automation in programming has increased programmer productivity and opened up many new applications.

Programmers like linkers and "make" help automate the toolchain.

IDEs provide a level of automation that ranges from source code to running a source-level debugger.

I suppose not. A programmer is needed to write / modify / update the machine to make it work. The one who loses his job due to automation is the one who we replace work with automation. Example:-

  1. Every 1 hour the technician will tour the factory to record the energy usage on the energy meter and deliver it to the supervisor and at the end of the day on a polar usage chart. Automation provides real-time reading directly to smartphone or dashboard with automated graph of incoming reading data. Who will lose their job?
  2. As an example; A general worker can produce at least 100 cardboard food packages per hour. Car
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I suppose not. A programmer is needed to write / modify / update the machine to make it work. The one who loses his job due to automation is the one who we replace work with automation. Example:-

  1. Every 1 hour the technician will tour the factory to record the energy usage on the energy meter and deliver it to the supervisor and at the end of the day on a polar usage chart. Automation provides real-time reading directly to smartphone or dashboard with automated graph of incoming reading data. Who will lose their job?
  2. As an example; A general worker can produce at least 100 cardboard food packages per hour. The automation machine can produce 1000 food carton packages per hour; Hours of operation 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, non-stop unless / maintenance / regulations occur. Who will lose their job?

Part of the country may not yet force Industry 4.0 (mainly in manufacturing) as it can kill the job and produce too many unemployed citizens.

This is the idea that Elon Musk and some others promote…. that AI will make humans obsolete and that we're only good at being pets.

Just because some famous and smart people think something and talk about it or give Ted talks doesn't mean it's real / true or something you need to worry about.

This feels like something exciting, "cool," "intellectual," "technological" to talk about and worry about, but it's actually a very silly thing to focus on.

The most serious problems to worry about are:

  1. The rate of creation of new antibiotics is slower than the increase in resistance in diseases.
  2. we don't really know the steady state equilibrium
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This is the idea that Elon Musk and some others promote…. that AI will make humans obsolete and that we're only good at being pets.

Just because some famous and smart people think something and talk about it or give Ted talks doesn't mean it's real / true or something you need to worry about.

This feels like something exciting, "cool," "intellectual," "technological" to talk about and worry about, but it's actually a very silly thing to focus on.

The most serious problems to worry about are:

  1. The rate of creation of new antibiotics is slower than the increase in resistance in diseases.
  2. We don't really know the steady-state equilibrium carrying capacity that the Earth has for humans…. What if it's only 500 million people?
  3. Related to the above: Too many countries have nuclear weapons. Maybe eventually numbers 2 and 3 will collide.
  4. Drinking water purification is slow compared to population growth
  5. Loss of habitat and genetic diversity in animals / plants means that we will have less to extract from in future attempts at crossbreeding and drug discovery (most drugs come from animal and plant discoveries rather than chemical / genetic engineering)
  6. Monoculture agriculture (such as Cavendish bananas) is creating risks for staple foods. see also 2,3,5

No.

Programmers will be among the last to lose all jobs to the automaton.

Watch:

Tim Mensch's answer to Will many software programmers face redundancy in the next 5 years as AI processes are used to automate the production of software program code?

It's not as much of a gold rush as it was during the dot-com boom, so to get hired right now, you really need to know how to code. But if you can program, you are safe from automation.

Heck, you're the one in charge of automation.

Miikka Kangas' Answer to Are Programmers at Risk of Losing Their Jobs Due to Automation? and no.

Elon Musk said excessive automation wasted much more time than it saved. (The original title for this was clickbait).

Programming is a type of creative processing in which humans are exceptional and the type of reaction-based systems that we have so far are terrible. All the processing power that we have in the world cannot compete with a single autonomic nervous system: Wikipedia, especially in terms of energy consumption.

In other words, anyone could beat the existing AI we have in their sleep.

The only thing

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Miikka Kangas' Answer to Are Programmers at Risk of Losing Their Jobs Due to Automation? and no.

Elon Musk said excessive automation wasted much more time than it saved. (The original title for this was clickbait).

Programming is a type of creative processing in which humans are exceptional and the type of reaction-based systems that we have so far are terrible. All the processing power that we have in the world cannot compete with a single autonomic nervous system: Wikipedia, especially in terms of energy consumption.

In other words, anyone could beat the existing AI we have in their sleep.

The only thing that computers improve and that humans do not handle well is accuracy. A computer, somewhere, knows exactly what happened somewhere on February 3, 1985. In fact, a computer can take all the information about itself and predict with a high degree of accuracy and precision what the weather will be like for a continent in an hour. A human, not so much.

But tell a computer to program another computer and it will be like:

The photo shows a computer fooling another computer, causing them to have very similar responses to everything.

Automation makes a programmer's job easier, but it doesn't. It simply means that a programmer will be more valuable to a company and have higher expectations of their performance.

Automation has been a productivity multiplier in all industries in which it is applied, and it only reduces the employment rate in industries that have a hard market capitalization; like agriculture. Fewer farmers are needed today to do the job of feeding the world, due to automation. It has been very difficult to find other profitable markets for food, although some governments have tried (such as corn biofuel subsidies in the US).

Usually,

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Automation makes a programmer's job easier, but it doesn't. It simply means that a programmer will be more valuable to a company and have higher expectations of their performance.

Automation has been a productivity multiplier in all industries in which it is applied, and it only reduces the employment rate in industries that have a hard market capitalization; like agriculture. Fewer farmers are needed today to do the job of feeding the world, due to automation. It has been very difficult to find other profitable markets for food, although some governments have tried (such as corn biofuel subsidies in the US).

However, in general, since automation relies on complex instructions / patterns that machines perform, an increase in automation anywhere leads to an increase in demand for programmers. Scheduling is rarely an automation project that is set up and forgotten. There are always updates and adaptations to a changing market or changing customer demands for a programmer to work. And bug fixes. And security (if you are connected to the Internet) and implementation. And code cleaning. And further automation, optimization, and documentation of the code in case you quit and someone else needs to know how to fix what you did. And read someone else's poor documentation so you can figure out how to fix what you did.

Then no. Programmers don't worry about increased automation, unless they're worried it's not happening fast enough for them to find a job.

Some have already done so.

Common applications like Word, Excel, Trello, Slack are often used out of the box. Competition programs are not written.

Wix, Weebly, WordPress, SquareSpace replace much of the website programming.

In terms of a 'magic AI' where you speak English (let's say) and spit out code, that may never happen.

But right now, traditional automation and pre-written applications mean that certain types of standardized programs are no longer created.

While there may be some loss of routine task type programming jobs, most of what programmers like me and my company do is nothing close to being automated.

My company hires web application development for primarily corporate clients, although we also do some for the state government here in Vermont. Much of the work we do requires a real understanding of what our customers are doing and how they want to use the system. While we can make use of some standard components, most of the code is custom designed and implemented. Replacing us would require artificial intelligence

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While there may be some loss of routine task type programming jobs, most of what programmers like me and my company do is nothing close to being automated.

My company hires web application development for primarily corporate clients, although we also do some for the state government here in Vermont. Much of the work we do requires a real understanding of what our customers are doing and how they want to use the system. While we can make use of some standard components, most of the code is custom designed and implemented. Replacing us would require artificial intelligence that should probably be able to pass the Turing test.

Yes. Ironically, it's the kind of job that should be one of the easiest to automate. In a sense, machine learning is already being done, only it would have been too slow work to make AI a viable technology.

I believe that as time passes and technology becomes more and more automated, boring and repetitive tasks will be eliminated and we will be left to do more creative work manually. Adjust our intentions (or explore our confusions). This part could also be possible to create technology, Elon Musk seems motivated to find out.

But we can always learn something new to be productive. I became

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Yes. Ironically, it's the kind of job that should be one of the easiest to automate. In a sense, machine learning is already being done, only it would have been too slow work to make AI a viable technology.

I believe that as time passes and technology becomes more and more automated, boring and repetitive tasks will be eliminated and we will be left to do more creative work manually. Adjust our intentions (or explore our confusions). This part could also be possible to create technology, Elon Musk seems motivated to find out.

But we can always learn something new to be productive. I became a software developer after 10 years of sales. I could change careers a few more times in my life, probably through management.

Well, eventually everything that can be automated will be. A lot of code will be used to do this and then it will freeze on the hardware.

The question is whether programming can be automated, in the extended sense of solving problems with a computational device (analog, digital, quantum, neural network, etc.).

I suspect that any computer that could program in this sense would have to do a lot of things that a developer generally avoids: requirement gathering and refinement, for example.

But many of these could be automated or at least learned with a program that found a simple solution for "I want a new button there" r

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Well, eventually everything that can be automated will be. A lot of code will be used to do this and then it will freeze on the hardware.

The question is whether programming can be automated, in the extended sense of solving problems with a computational device (analog, digital, quantum, neural network, etc.).

I suspect that any computer that could program in this sense would have to do a lot of things that a developer generally avoids: requirement gathering and refinement, for example.

But many of these could be automated or at least learned, say, if a program that found a simple solution to "I want a new button there" required asking a lot more questions.

I suspect that the work of programmers would evolve into a computer trainer.

Yes, many are.

Automation takes care of a lot of simple tasks and now you can get wizards that create simple websites for you. There are many tasks that previously required custom software, and now you can pay for a cloud service that performs them.

Still, custom software that requires creativity and technical expertise is far from automated, it may never happen. But yeah, I think jobs near the lowest level of experience will continue to be automated.

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