Are all jobs dangerous?

Updated on : December 3, 2021 by Anthony Miller



Are all jobs dangerous?

I guess for every job there is a potential argument that someone could make. For example, I am an accountant, which is not normally considered "dangerous"; However, there are known health risks of sitting at a desk and staring at a monitor for a long time, and if I don't do my job wrong, bad things can certainly happen. Someone might even be really spurious and argue that because there is a non-zero risk that a co-worker or member of the public will attack me for no reason, it would be legitimate to say that it is at least potentially dangerous.

But there is a set of what is generally considered or not

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I guess for every job there is a potential argument that someone could make. For example, I am an accountant, which is not normally considered "dangerous"; However, there are known health risks of sitting at a desk and staring at a monitor for a long time, and if I don't do my job wrong, bad things can certainly happen. Someone might even be really spurious and argue that because there is a non-zero risk that a co-worker or member of the public will attack me for no reason, it would be legitimate to say that it is at least potentially dangerous.

But there is a set of what is generally considered or understood as “hazardous work” that does not include all jobs.

With so many incidents today of people entering workplaces with a weapon, I would say yes, it would appear that all jobs are dangerous from that perspective. And until the government does something about gun control, it will stay that way and will most likely get worse.

Only if you do stupid things. You'd think the office would be safer than the workshop; That is, until you leave a desk or file drawer open, don't look and trip over it. Spatial awareness is an important aspect of security. Since all jobs are dangerous, I'll just fix computers, thank you.

Up to a point, yes.

examples ... the abortion gynecologist faces the danger of pro-life people

... gardeners mowing the lawn face the danger of flying debris

Every job can have liability issues.

In a sense, probably yes.

Even the most stable and secure job in the world carries the danger of complacency and boredom.

John

Why is driving a truck a dangerous job?

Here is a surprising fact. More than 80% of fatal truck / car accidents were the fault of the car driver.

I just wanted to leave it there before starting my answer. I retired from OTR driving in 2008, after 15 years. I have more than 2 million miles with no chargeable accidents. I was involved in three accidents. I was rear-ended during a slowdown in traffic, I was struck sideways by a car trying to pass me on a two-lane highway, and a drunk driver collided with me after he fell asleep while passing me.

I know many drivers who have driven for many years.

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Why is driving a truck a dangerous job?

Here is a surprising fact. More than 80% of fatal truck / car accidents were the fault of the car driver.

I just wanted to leave it there before starting my answer. I retired from OTR driving in 2008, after 15 years. I have more than 2 million miles with no chargeable accidents. I was involved in three accidents. I was rear-ended during a slowdown in traffic, I was struck sideways by a car trying to pass me on a two-lane highway, and a drunk driver collided with me after he fell asleep while passing me.

I know many drivers who have driven many more years, with many more miles traveled safely than I have.

The danger comes mainly from other people and from your own lack of competence. Safety precautions have to be followed, and if they aren't, unplanned things happen. You have to be aware of what is happening on both sides, behind you and in front of you as far as you can see. You need to have that awareness every second that you are driving. You also need to be able to process that information almost immediately in order to adapt to those unplanned events. You must be properly trained and have one or two years of experience before you start doing it. I can't count how many times I avoided an accident just by being able to react to a situation before it became a problem.

There are many equipment failures that can be prevented simply by doing your previous morning trip, or by having your "B" service run as scheduled, or by making sure the trailer brakes are properly adjusted BEFORE you start down a hill. 5 miles at 6/7 percent. Too many times drivers get complacent and the next thing you know, you see a guy whose brakes are on fire halfway through "The Cabbage."

Speed ​​is another factor. I have seen many accidents that would not have happened if the driver had been driving at the right speed for the conditions, rather than having that “it will never happen to me” mentality. When conditions permitted, he drove at speeds of 68 to 73 on interstate highways and within limits on other highways. I once went through a sandstorm in Quartzite, AZ. Visibility was close to zero. All I could see was the lane marker. With the hazard flashers flashing, I reduced my speed to 10 miles per hour. When I got out of it, it was next to another truck that I had no idea was there.

Fatigue is another big problem. I have driven for many hours over the legal limit and am still as alert as when I started. I also had to stand in a rest area and take a short nap after two hours of driving after a full eight hours of sleep. The point is, if the dream monster starts sneaking up on you, it's time to react. Sometimes just stopping and walking around your truck will get you back to normal, or some other "trick" you use to wake up, but in the end, sleep is the only thing that heals you.

This is going to be a lot longer than I intended, but I guess the point is that riding a Big Rig has dangers that can be mitigated with the above mentioned things and good common sense. You can't control the unexpected, but you can control how you prepare for them.

Surely working as a cleaner in a sewage treatment plant would be considered the most dangerous job.

Painting the beams of the Sydney Harbor Bridge annually would also be considered hazardous work, although the spectacular scenery you see every day probably makes it worth it.

According to Safe Work Australia's Key Occupational Safety and Health Statistics 2017, the agriculture, forestry and fisheries industry averaged 16.5 deaths per 1,000,000 workers in 2017, with the transport, storage and warehousing industry ranked second place with a rate of 8.5. It is interesting that people abroad care about our so-called "dang

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Surely working as a cleaner in a sewage treatment plant would be considered the most dangerous job.

Painting the beams of the Sydney Harbor Bridge annually would also be considered hazardous work, although the spectacular scenery you see every day probably makes it worth it.

According to Safe Work Australia's Key Occupational Safety and Health Statistics 2017, the agriculture, forestry and fisheries industry averaged 16.5 deaths per 1,000,000 workers in 2017, with the transport, storage and warehousing industry ranked second place with a rate of 8.5. It is interesting that people abroad are concerned about our so-called "dangerous wildlife". Well, far more Australians are injured by cows or horses than by snake bites or crocodile attacks (the latter only attack German backpackers anyway… they seem to have grown fond of German meat).

The job with the most interesting title that I find quite dangerous is "Noxious Weed Officer." NWOs inspect agricultural properties and fine farmers if they do not remove harmful weeds from their properties. Therefore, they not only have to deal with angry farmers, they also have to deal with noxious plants.

I have had relatively "safe" jobs, which required me to:

  1. Use very sharp knives and other sharp tools on a regular basis.
  2. Stand on the stairs.
  3. Lift really heavy objects.
  4. Stand on stairs AND lift really heavy objects at the same time.
  5. Remove cargo pallets (weighing about a ton each) from a temperature controlled truck that had dropped below freezing, so the floor of the truck was covered in icy snow.

Number four felt like one of the most dangerous. I once had to stand on an 8 foot ladder to stack boxes of oranges that were stacked at a height of about 10 feet, and the boxes weighed 40 pounds.

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I have had relatively "safe" jobs, which required me to:

  1. Use very sharp knives and other sharp tools on a regular basis.
  2. Stand on the stairs.
  3. Lift really heavy objects.
  4. Stand on stairs AND lift really heavy objects at the same time.
  5. Remove cargo pallets (weighing about a ton each) from a temperature controlled truck that had dropped below freezing, so the floor of the truck was covered in icy snow.

Number four felt like one of the most dangerous. I once had to stand on an 8 foot ladder in order to stack boxes of oranges that were stacked about 10 feet high, and the boxes weighed 40 pounds each. Have you ever had to lift something that requires BOTH hands while standing on a ladder? Now imagine you weigh 40 pounds. Then multiply by doing that about 20 times, until the pile is low enough that you can reach the boxes from the floor.

Number five was also very dangerous. On one occasion, the electric pallet truck on our side of the store was out of order, and the truck driver waited for my team and I to remove the pallets from the truck with regular old electric pallet trucks. The loading dock was tilted, so there was a high probability that the pallets would slide directly towards us if we lost our balance and possibly fell on top of us. Especially with the wet, slippery and icy conditions of the trailer floor. I refused to do it manually. And after almost spilling with the electric jack, I refused to do the rest of the shock myself. That kind of risk was way above my salary level.

Thanks for the A2A ...

I guess it was for Afghanistan, even though I'm Australian. So I'll answer for Australia first and then Afghanistan ...

  • Sprayer pilot

People who fly low, near trees and power lines, all the time. At least when he lived on a farm 20 years ago. They crashed all the time!

  • Undercover cop

I think it's kind of obvious why

(Australia's 'Most Dangerous Jobs' Are More Boring: Australia's Most Dangerous Jobs Revealed)

For Afghanistan, I will guess….

  • Deminers

Not just because of the obvious - your target is designed to explode and kill you, but also because

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Thanks for the A2A ...

I guess it was for Afghanistan, even though I'm Australian. So I'll answer for Australia first and then Afghanistan ...

  • Sprayer pilot

People who fly low, near trees and power lines, all the time. At least when he lived on a farm 20 years ago. They crashed all the time!

  • Undercover cop

I think it's kind of obvious why

(Australia's 'Most Dangerous Jobs' Are More Boring: Australia's Most Dangerous Jobs Revealed)

For Afghanistan, I will guess….

  • Deminers

Not only because of the obvious - his target is designed to explode and kill him, but also because his workplace is the same workplace as the Taliban.

  • Afghan Police and Army

Always a target, not as protected as the foreign military, and they have to live their private lives within the country they are fighting for. Furthermore, the mothers and sisters of the German soldiers are in Germany, the mothers and sisters of the Afghan soldiers are in the city, in an unprotected house.

  • Suicide bombers

Weeellll, if you don't get shot trying to do your job, the only way to survive is to completely fail!

Sewer and sewer workers.

Yes, you heard right.

An illustrative image below

According to me, sewer workers handle the toughest and most dangerous work in the world. It is estimated that 1.2 million garbage collectors in the country are involved in the sanitation of our environment.

Aside from the social atrocities these workers face, they are exposed to certain health problems by virtue of their occupation. These health hazards include exposure to harmful gases such as methane and hydrogen sulfide, cardiovascular degeneration, musculoskeletal disorders such as osteoarthritic changes, and intervention.

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Sewer and sewer workers.

Yes, you heard right.

An illustrative image below

According to me, sewer workers handle the toughest and most dangerous work in the world. It is estimated that 1.2 million garbage collectors in the country are involved in the sanitation of our environment.

Aside from the social atrocities these workers face, they are exposed to certain health problems by virtue of their occupation. These health hazards include exposure to harmful gases such as methane and hydrogen sulfide, cardiovascular degeneration, musculoskeletal disorders such as osteoarthritic changes and herniated intervertebral disc, infections such as hepatitis, leptospirosis and helicobacter, skin problems, respiratory system problems and parameters impaired lung function.

Do you know how much they get paid for this job? Less than 150 INR per day (that is, only $ 2.5).

A more recent survey says that the estimated number of deaths in India each year is 22,327. 80% of deaths are due to suffocation.

Another illustrative image of how they handle sewer sludge.

It is very encouraging to see your occupation to survive. Hats off to your engagement.

Image courtesy of ~~ Google

There are many professions in which life is at stake in a particular position, so they cannot be overly generalized.

I remember that when I was a child my father from Asstt, a collector of the narcotics department, used to go with other security personnel in search of those responsible for the opium smuggling and that also at night. He was too small even to understand, but that in itself is life-threatening, as I later understood.

One of my uncle who served on RAW and had to travel which was kept secret from his immediate family and his life is always at risk. I have heard cases where your family needed your presence and could not

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There are many professions in which life is at stake in a particular position, so they cannot be overly generalized.

I remember that when I was a child my father from Asstt, a collector of the narcotics department, used to go with other security personnel in search of those responsible for the opium smuggling and that also at night. He was too small even to understand, but that in itself is life-threatening, as I later understood.

One of my uncle who served on RAW and had to travel which was kept secret from his immediate family and his life is always at risk. I have heard cases where your family needed your presence and you could not contact them directly, so you could not help in a short time.

Here it was not only a personal risk, but even the family was lost, unlike the support that people can have in the army, which is also organized on a social level.

Sincerity at work that go miles in solving immediate problems for a larger goal that goes beyond your own safety.

Let me recount another example of my first organization at JK Synthetics back in 1977 onwards.

It was an organization that produced polymeric fibers, so it cannot be assumed that it is not safe. In one case, a bail press that is used to press polymeric staple fiber into bales that are sold to the user into fabrics.

The bale press is heavy tonnage and one of them broke.

It had to be taken care of as soon as possible because that was the point of departure or final product.

The mechanics were working, but a senior engineer instead of explaining thought about checking certain wiring himself in his desire to get it back up and running early.

I was working inside when the Ram to push was up.

Something happened and Ram jumped and climbed down, spontaneously crushing the engineer.

You can argue about safety regulations that are not followed, etc. but it is not like that because casualties still occur, which only takes a moment and I am saying that the period in which the securities were taken care of, no doubt, but loyalty and sincerity were more important. for some at some point.

The military profession is one of those that certainly makes one disciplined and forces one to practice the most difficult situation possible.

Well, people who have to face war always risk their lives, while people who pass peacefully enjoy the benefits of being in that profession.

Safer is working in the family organization and not assuming any job responsibility.

Ironically, such a safe place spoils the mind and makes life risky due to your own actions.

I consider the safest possibility only when we are working with honest intentions, sincerity, like surrendering to the will of God when HE takes care of it in the best way.

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