After swatting flies, is it better to clean their corpses or leave them as a warning to their brothers?

Updated on : December 3, 2021 by Scarlett Scott



After swatting flies, is it better to clean their corpses or leave them as a warning to their brothers?

None. Instead, develop a fascinating relationship with a wild animal that will provide you with a great opportunity to study highly rated predatory behavior.

My first apartment was a room in a small warehouse used to store furniture. It was actually a nicely refurbished little place, but the windows were quite old. And since it was a semi-rural location, there was always a fly problem.

Except in a window. And that's where I discovered my new roommate, a jumping spider. Or, as I later called him, Jack (short for 'Jumping Jack').

I was walking through this window one night, why?

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None. Instead, develop a fascinating relationship with a wild animal that will provide you with a great opportunity to study highly rated predatory behavior.

My first apartment was a room in a small warehouse used to store furniture. It was actually a nicely refurbished little place, but the windows were quite old. And since it was a semi-rural location, there was always a fly problem.

Except in a window. And that's where I discovered my new roommate, a jumping spider. Or, as I later called him, Jack (short for 'Jumping Jack').

One night when I first saw this window, I was walking through this window: a small, stocky spider crawled, stalked, and then jumped (jumps vertically, no less) on top of a large blowfly that must have been 3 times its size. This was followed by a fuzzy, spinning fight that went on for 30 seconds (it seemed like a half hour) with Jack, and his incredible Venom, victorious at the end.

From there I was also hooked. Soon he was scanning other windows for fly activity. I struck to stun, not to kill. Enough to transfer Jack's next meal to the lawn by his window.

Jack soon grew up, and I'm tempted to believe, he learned to recognize that my approach meant another meal.

In the meantime, I did more research. The books in the library (that's how old this story is) helped me identify their species and discover the incredible abilities of these amazing little predators.

Drama, action, science. Wonder. And a way to go from a fly problem to a flight theater.

I recommend you try it!

There is a particular type of fly that is especially irritating. East:

That is a deer fly. They fly slowly and are easily crushed. However, their preferred habitat is deep forests, and if you're busy making your way through vegetation, your punch will be delivered only as a reflex action after these little suckers bite you.

And so it was, in the distant days of my fetid youth, when my companion and I worked in the game lands of western Maryland, deep within game reserves and sanctuaries.

Smash! Slap! Oh! Bastard! Dammit! That was our main vocabulary as we trudged through the

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There is a particular type of fly that is especially irritating. East:

That is a deer fly. They fly slowly and are easily crushed. However, their preferred habitat is deep forests, and if you're busy making your way through vegetation, your punch will be delivered only as a reflex action after these little suckers bite you.

And so it was, in the distant days of my fetid youth, when my companion and I worked in the game lands of western Maryland, deep within game reserves and sanctuaries.

Smash! Slap! Oh! Bastard! Dammit! That was our main vocabulary as we trudged through the remote forests of Garrett County surrounded by swarms of these little infernos.

We had our revenge during our lunch break, when we lit a small campfire to toast our now moist and spoiled sandwiches. Sitting by the fire, we could easily catch these little buggers out of the air. Our quarry was enclosed in an empty matchbox, reserved for this purpose.

And as a final act before returning to the forest with an ax and brush hook, we placed the vibrating box on the burning embers of our campfire and emitted an eerie song as the inhabitants were slowly suffocated and finally consumed by the pyre.

It was of no use.

The first thing you see when you walk into my room is the gutted remains of a Mosquito Hawk stained on the wall.

One night, while I was sitting in my room with the lights dimmed, one of these motherfuckers buzzed dangerously close to my face.

Like any good, law-abiding American citizen, I armed myself to defend my home from foreign invaders. The offending creature had the gall to perch on MY wall, where it spent the last of its days (seconds?) Brutally rubbing its legs like needles in a gesture of sexual perversion.

I crawled silently across the dark wooden floor, my weapon raised above my head.

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The first thing you see when you walk into my room is the gutted remains of a Mosquito Hawk stained on the wall.

One night, while I was sitting in my room with the lights dimmed, one of these motherfuckers buzzed dangerously close to my face.

Like any good, law-abiding American citizen, I armed myself to defend my home from foreign invaders. The offending creature had the gall to perch on MY wall, where it spent the last of its days (seconds?) Brutally rubbing its legs like needles in a gesture of sexual perversion.

I crept silently across the dark wooden floor, my weapon raised above my head. At last I stood in front of him. I cast my gaze on the savage monster one last time before tapping my history folder, laden with the traumas of civil war, on this evolutionary flaw, leaving a sordid stain on the inglorious wall.

Not once have I contemplated removing the crucified corpse. Now, every creeping perversion of natural selection that enters my room will know of its own impending doom.

Every few days, a new competitor decides to throw the gauntlet and brazenly wanders through the air of my abode. Always, I fulfill my responsibility as an American citizen and destroy that son of a bitch before he can terrorize anyone else. A message to all the flies: Fuck off.

Question: After swatting flies, is it better to clean their carcasses or leave them as a warning to their brothers?

You should definitely drop them. In "The Art of War," Sun Tzu, the genius strategist that he is, asserts that supreme excellence is not to fight and win every battle, but to break the enemy's resistance without fighting.

And nothing breaks other flies like seeing the corpses of your deceased companions. Flies absolutely have a concept of camaraderie and will stay away from your property because they will know how bad you are for squashing them.

So leave them. Let your remnant

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Question: After swatting flies, is it better to clean their carcasses or leave them as a warning to their brothers?

You should definitely drop them. In "The Art of War," Sun Tzu, the genius strategist that he is, asserts that supreme excellence is not to fight and win every battle, but to break the enemy's resistance without fighting.

And nothing breaks other flies like seeing the corpses of your deceased companions. Flies absolutely have a concept of camaraderie and will stay away from your property because they will know how bad you are for squashing them.

So leave them. May his remains be a warning to everyone else!

Or, you know, you can clean your house because it doesn't make any difference. First of all, time moves differently when you are a fly. Even if they could form a coherent inference about the nature of their fallen brothers' premature demise (who can't), they wouldn't think they are next. Time passes slower for flies as their brains work much faster than ours (not having an understanding of the nature of the world tends to do that).

Second, the flies cannot at all make a judgment about their "warnings." They are only frightened by immediate and not abstract threats. If you run towards it, it will fly (they are very sensitive to movement). But you won't be scared off by an abstract concept.

Finally, they can potentially carry hundreds of bacteria and viruses, some of which are quite dangerous, especially if you have immunity issues.

If you really want to send a message, get one of these:

Insects have NO understanding that there are other organisms. However, this may not be advisable with roaches.

Diptera, which are the true flies, are not viviparous and do not store hormones. I'm not sure about pheromones. However, flying animals likely do not carry a large amount of pheromones in their bodies. The stored pheromones are too heavy for flying animals. They can't even see the corpses clearly.

Now, leaving dead flies is unpleasant. So I would clean the bodies, anyway. However, live flies don't care one way or another how many flies came before them.

Cockroach f

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Insects have NO understanding that there are other organisms. However, this may not be advisable with roaches.

Diptera, which are the true flies, are not viviparous and do not store hormones. I'm not sure about pheromones. However, flying animals likely do not carry a large amount of pheromones in their bodies. The stored pheromones are too heavy for flying animals. They can't even see the corpses clearly.

Now, leaving dead flies is unpleasant. So I would clean the bodies, anyway. However, live flies don't care one way or another how many flies came before them.

Female cockroaches are viviparous. Their eggs hatch inside their bodies. So if you leave a dead female cockroach, the baby can be shot out of her carcass.

Male cockroaches emit a pheromone to attract females. So if you squash a roach, large amounts of this pheromone are released. Then the cockroaches will come running to find this super male with the pheronome. This will look very unpleasant.

So dispose of the dead roaches and clean the area thoroughly.

I am retired. I have thought a lot about this. After many years of trying both ways, I have come to my solution.

I wake up and grab my fly swatter head into the kitchen and hit my first fly. Place it on the kitchen table. Go to the bathroom and squash one of the flies there. Wash my face, brush my teeth, finish my other bathroom chores. My last task in the bathroom is. It consists of collecting the dead fly and placing it in the corner of the sink. In each room I have a place to put the first dead fly for that room. A flat horizontal place, so that friends and family can come to cry not too much so that the mourner

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I am retired. I have thought a lot about this. After many years of trying both ways, I have come to my solution.

I wake up and grab my fly swatter head into the kitchen and hit my first fly. Place it on the kitchen table. Go to the bathroom and squash one of the flies. Wash my face, brush my teeth, finish my other bathroom chores. My last task in the bathroom is. It consists of collecting the dead fly and placing it in the corner of the sink. In each room I have a place to put the first dead fly for that room. A flat horizontal place, so that friends a family can come to cry not very big so the mourners have to stay together, they refuse social distance. They are not limited to 15 mourners, as required by state law, nor do they wear masks.

When I get back to the kitchen with my trusty fly swatter. I beat the mourners. Never get them all. Make breakfast, sit down for breakfast by the time breakfast is done, several seats later, no more mourners in the kitchen.

As I move through the flyswatter house in hand, I discard the hordes of flies, all the dead in a neat pile in each room. I don't have to look for them, eventually all the flies have to go mourn the dead.

In Spain they get yellow crumbs of some sweet and toxic substance for flies. This is what is happening:

A fly comes and begins to eat the crumbs. Soon it begins to weaken. Another fly breaks in and pushes the weaker fly out of the way to reach the crumbs. It also begins to weaken.

A third fly arrives. The first fly is now dying. The newcomer makes his way through the sick and dying flies to catch the crumbs. It also begins to weaken.

Now a fourth fly appears. The first fly is already dead. The other two are dying. The fourth fly pushes its way past the other flies and begins to eat t

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In Spain they get yellow crumbs of some sweet and toxic substance for flies. This is what is happening:

A fly comes and begins to eat the crumbs. Soon it begins to weaken. Another fly breaks in and pushes the weaker fly out of the way to reach the crumbs. It also begins to weaken.

A third fly arrives. The first fly is now dying. The newcomer makes his way through the sick and dying flies to catch the crumbs. It also begins to weaken.

Now a fourth fly appears. The first fly is already dead. The other two are dying. The fourth fly works its way through the other flies and begins to eat the crumbs.

Half an hour later there are at least a dozen flies, some dead, some dying. New flies keep arriving, shoving off their dead and dying companions and eating the crumbs.

So the short answer is, no, don't bother leaving the flies dead as a warning. Flies are too stupid to take such a subtle hint.

For my part, I don't think the flies deserve to receive a burial of any kind, cleaning them is almost saying that they won.

Remember, they're always up to something with those hand gestures, so leaving them as they are is simply inviting their unholy breath to try necromancy.

So what is the solution? "You might ask. Well-

Fire!

Burn them whole until there is nothing left but ashes. You see, while the sight of dead flies would be intimidating, it has a much smaller range than the smell. Others would pass by thinking “Hey, someone is burning some kind of meat. This smell is kind

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For my part, I don't think the flies deserve to receive a burial of any kind, cleaning them is almost saying that they won.

Remember, they're always up to something with those hand gestures, so leaving them as they are is simply inviting their unholy breath to try necromancy.

So what is the solution? "You might ask. Well-

Fire!

Burn them whole until there is nothing left but ashes. You see, while the sight of dead flies would be intimidating, it has a much smaller range than the smell. Others would pass by thinking “Hey, someone is burning some kind of meat. This smell is a little strange, it reminds me of ... oh my, Frank! "

You scare them, deny them necromantic possibilities, and have a clean house.

But I hear you ask, “Isn't burning them like cremating? Wouldn't it be some kind of burial like the first one you opposed? To which I reply:

No.

Sounds fun, but no, flies don't learn that specific lesson.

What you HAVE to do is STOP squashing flies, there is a much easier way to deal with them, unless you really like to burn calories and all that physical stuff.

Get a can of hairspray, you are looking for something with propellant with a retention factor of "Maximum" or "Instant Hold".

Now put away that damn pyro lighter, you are not going to burn them, that makes a nasty smell.

Just spray an incoming fly with this hairspray, their wings and legs will freeze in place, now just remove their wings and dip them in water (this shou

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Sounds fun, but no, flies don't learn that specific lesson.

What you HAVE to do is STOP squashing flies, there is a much easier way to deal with them, unless you really like to burn calories and all that physical stuff.

Get a can of hairspray, you are looking for something with propellant with a retention factor of "Maximum" or "Instant Hold".

Now put away that damn pyro lighter, you are not going to burn them, that makes a nasty smell.

Just spray an incoming fly with this hairspray, their wings and legs will freeze in place, now just remove the wings and dip them in water (this should release the hairspray). Now instead of a FLY, you have a DRAG.

Yes he was a terrible child

Jeff

Throw away the carcass and be sure to clean the surface of the fly swatter as well.

I swatted a fly with a book on the ground. It was a particularly fat fly, the metallic green variety with a rounded abdomen and a loud buzzing sound. I don't usually leave fly corpses lying around, especially in the middle of the ground where people could step on them. This time, I didn't get it fast enough. When I finally looked closer to pick up the corpse, I noticed that there were little worms crawling out of the squashed belly of the fly. I couldn't have seen them if I hadn't been paying attention. I spent the rest of the day worrying

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Throw away the carcass and be sure to clean the surface of the fly swatter as well.

I swatted a fly with a book on the ground. It was a particularly fat fly, the metallic green variety with a rounded abdomen and a loud buzzing sound. I don't usually leave fly corpses lying around, especially in the middle of the ground where people could step on them. This time, I didn't get it fast enough. When I finally looked closer to pick up the corpse, I noticed that there were little worms crawling out of the squashed belly of the fly. I couldn't have seen them if I hadn't been paying attention. I spent the rest of the day worrying about the barely visible worms crawling on the floor of my room.

Now I clean the floor and the fly swatter every time I kill a fly.

I would suggest getting rid of the evidence. There are apparently 11 species of Drosphila (flies) that are on the endangered list (http://scienceblogs.com/evolgen/2006/12/save_the_flies.php) and yours could be one of them. The last thing you want is to get arrested for killing one of them. That's the kind of advertising you might want to avoid ...

Also, flies only have around 100k neurons and getting food is at the top of their list of activities, as you may have noticed. If one of your friends gets shot down, you probably think there is more food for them and they will continue to bother you.

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