After submitting a resignation at my current company, my new company withdrew the offer. My current company does not accept my request to withdraw my resignation. Am I totally screwed?

Updated on : January 17, 2022 by Derick Palmer



After submitting a resignation at my current company, my new company withdrew the offer. My current company does not accept my request to withdraw my resignation. Am I totally screwed?

Basically yes.

Imagine that your company has been your partner for, presumably, several years. You meet another person who is younger, more attractive, and you leave your partner to be with this new person.

Your new love interest changes her mind and says she doesn't want to be with you anymore. That is the position you are currently in.

Your company may feel rejected. You obviously don't want to work with them. They may also feel that this is a blessing in disguise, as they felt that you were not a good fit, and this means they don't have to go through a performance review path with you.

You have very few options. One thing you could try is to have an honest conversation with whoever hired you in the first place and explain why you wanted to leave and why you made a mistake. Don't hold your breath, but you have nothing else to lose.

Yes. They can refuse to accept it and it remains valid. Any resignation is valid as of the date of the letter. The letter does not need to conform to any specific format and you do not need to comply with the obligations of your employment contract. The employer is responsible for explaining what you must do to leave in good faith; after giving your letter / talking to them about the resignation.

Once you submit your resignation, you will be subject to the labor rules in your country governing resignations and the terms of release in your employment contract and / or employee handbook. Many of the terms in the employees

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Yes. They can refuse to accept it and it remains valid. Any resignation is valid as of the date of the letter. The letter does not need to conform to any specific format and you do not need to comply with the obligations of your employment contract. The employer is responsible for explaining what you must do to leave in good faith; after giving your letter / talking to them about the resignation.

Once you submit your resignation, you will be subject to the labor rules in your country governing resignations and the terms of release in your employment contract and / or employee handbook. Many of the terms of employment contracts are difficult to enforce in court. Companies include them in an effort to cover all possible risks, however many such recoveries on sales commissions are simply invalid and, in some places, illegal.

In most countries, you can stop working today and as long as you have not received an advance salary and your absence does not inflict measurable and quantifiable harm to the employer, it would be difficult for the employer to enforce (through the courts) any exit . clauses of your contract. You are employed and paid for the work you do; stop working and there is no obligation.

Most people don't do this. There is a great reputational risk from "quitting work." So most people submit a resignation letter, discuss with their management the best way to deliver, and get out on good terms with everyone involved.

Sometimes things are not so nice. The manager involved or HR may be mandated to "reject all resignations first" to reduce staff turnover and give them more time to find reinforcements. Or it could just be a bad manager. From a business process standpoint, it sounds good. Legally and functionally it is a joke.

It is better to read the exit clauses in employment contracts such as: "If you want to leave, we will pay you 3 months to deliver your work. You can leave immediately and you will not receive a letter of recommendation. If you have received an advance of salary and you you go immediately, you will have to return it. " I have only seen one company with a contract like this in my career.

You can only be obliged to work for what you have been paid for. Everything else is a choice.

To answer the question: When should a person resign after receiving a job offer?

I generally advise people to wait for the WRITTEN offer ”to ACCEPT. In other words, you may get a first offer and counter it with a raise in salary.

I know some people who actually got a so-called "verbal" offer, pulled the trigger on their resignation letter and something happened. Remember that a verbal offer is NOT worth the paper it is written on.

In fact, I had a problem where I had what could be considered a verbal offer. But nothing has been written for quite some time.

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To answer the question: When should a person resign after receiving a job offer?

I generally advise people to wait for the WRITTEN offer ”to ACCEPT. In other words, you may get a first offer and counter it with a raise in salary.

I know some people who actually got a so-called "verbal" offer, pulled the trigger on their resignation letter and something happened. Remember that a verbal offer is NOT worth the paper it is written on.

In fact, I had a problem where I had what could be considered a verbal offer. But nothing has been written for quite some time. The manager kept saying he was busy. She knew him from outside activities and had no reason to distrust him. I was also faced with having to sign another one-year contract with my current employer. After waiting over a month, I finally told the hiring manager, if I did not have a written offer by the end of the week, then I will withdraw from consideration.

He finally got up and did what he had to do to get Human Resources to submit the offer. I accepted. I was with the company for a total of 12 years (including a major move and division change, before the division was spun off and sold. Soon after, I received another offer at a new company.

All that to say, always wait for what is written.

No you should not. Make sure you have the offer in writing first and read carefully and make sure the contract meets your expectations, salary, start date and includes anything else that was discussed earlier during the hiring process. If the contact is okay, please sign, send back, confirm receipt, and then resign.

If you resign without a contract, you risk:

  • the company rescinds a verbal offer if for any reason you change your mind, such as financing or other reasons related to the position. Nothing can be done here as it is only a verbal agreement; therefore, you will have to rescind your resignation
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No you should not. Make sure you have the offer in writing first and read carefully and make sure the contract meets your expectations, salary, start date and includes anything else that was discussed earlier during the hiring process. If the contact is okay, please sign, send back, confirm receipt, and then resign.

If you resign without a contract, you risk:

  • the company rescinds a verbal offer if for any reason you change your mind, such as financing or other reasons related to the position. Nothing can be done here as it is only a verbal agreement; therefore, you must rescind your resignation (see final point);
  • You receive the contract and it does not meet your salary / other requirements or as promised in the interview. You can check it out, but if they don't budge then accept it or you will have to ask your current employer to rescind your resignation;
  • Asking for the termination of your resignation, it depends on your relationship and history, but regardless of whether your current employer refuses, as they have shown that they have lost interest / are not loyal and want to move on, or will not give in as they decided they can save by abolishing or demoting your current position, etc. If this happens, then you are unemployed!

Yes, many companies allow their former employees to return to their previous companies after having quit earlier. Some companies like TCS have a clause not to hire their former employees, but most companies in the world do not have such policies. So you can quit Company A today in search of a new job, let's say. After two months, you can go back to your company. Yes, an interview will be required, but if you are someone very important to the company and your position has not yet been replaced, you may be let in without an interview and reinstated.

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Yes, many companies allow their former employees to return to their previous companies after having quit earlier. Some companies like TCS have a clause not to hire their former employees, but most companies in the world do not have such policies. So you can quit Company A today in search of a new job, let's say. After two months, you can go back to your company. Yes, an interview will be required, but if you are a very important person to the company and your position has not yet been replaced, you may be let in without an interview and have your position and salary reinstated.

However, this depends from company to company. Some might interview you, some might not. Some can give you the old salary, others can also give you a raise. Sometimes, although on rare occasions, their salary may be reduced a bit as they had no better place to go and now they will seek to exploit it. These employees are often mocked and called 'boomerang employees'.

However, people are cunning. They will first leave Company A. Join Company B with a higher salary, work there for a few months, and return to Company A with an additional salary increase. They can also be promoted along the way. This is a technique some professionals use to quickly increase their salaries and get a promotion that was perhaps long overdue. But to discourage this, some companies have adopted a strict policy of not rehire their former employees.

This would be very rare, except in the case of falsification of the data you provided or a failure of the drug test. With recruiting websites like Glassdoor having employee comment provisions, most companies understand that terminating a job offer without cause would be death to future recruiting efforts if those comments were posted in an objective and professional manner. Also, in college recruiting, the perception of companies recruiting on a specific campus is a very active and important communication. Similarly, rescinding an offer to a recent or near-graduate would be frowned upon.

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This would be very rare, except in the case of falsification of the data you provided or a failure of the drug test. With recruiting websites like Glassdoor having employee comment provisions, most companies understand that terminating a job offer without cause would be death to future recruiting efforts if those comments were posted in an objective and professional manner. Also, in college recruiting, the perception of companies recruiting on a specific campus is a very active and important communication. Similarly, terminating an offer to a recent or near recent graduate would be death to recruiting success on that campus for at least a couple of years.

All that said, you are not an employee until you show up for work on the first day. Sometimes "things" happen. On the bright side, as a new hire, you will be virtually exempt from the risk of termination for the first year. While this is not a formal rule, most companies apply this logic for the same reasons as discussed above ……… and perhaps because it is ethical. :)

If your reason for quitting was for better benefits, and the counter offer meets your requirements, and otherwise you like the current job, the people, and the company, it might make sense.

If your reason was not profit, the counter offer is of zero value. Same job, people and company. Better dental or whatever you don't use doesn't change that. Even more money ... you get used to the urge, then the reason you quit starts to bother you again.

By resigning you tried to create some change. Be honest and objective with yourself about what you really want and need, and work towards it.

Why would you want to share your resignation email with your new organization?

If they haven't requested it, they don't need to share it.

If you are negotiating a revised entry date and the new company wants some proof to verify the date you are being relieved, then you can share the mail with them (if you really need to convince them of the new entry date).

It is not good practice and normally no reputable organization asks to submit a resignation letter to the former company. They usually want a letter of relief just to confirm that your previous employer has formally released you.

Request a letter

Once you have a SIGNED printed letter from the company and have already worked with HR on a start date. That date will be on the letter.

More recently, instead of snail mail, HR creates a letter, prints it, signs it, and sends a PDF copy. You print it out, sign the agreement, and send them the PDF.

THEN and only then deliver your notice.

All of that depends on the culture of the company.

How do you treat people who resign?

Do they have a goodbye lunch, treat them with dignity, and allow them to finish their work and catch up with their coworkers before they leave?

Or are they trying to expel them in a humiliating way?

The smart thing is to let them know as far in advance as possible, so they can prepare for your departure and you can finish things to the best of your ability.

But if company policy isn't set up for that, just do what's best for you and walk away with minimal notice.

Not unilaterally.

The employer must agree to the withdrawal and is under no obligation to do so.

In most cases (I've done this), it will depend on the circumstances that led to the original letter and what caused you to want to withdraw it.

Most employers won't want you around once you've indicated that you want to get out.

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