After a lot happened, I finally got my dream job. But I still feel restless and worry about everything that might go wrong at work. How do I get over this?

Updated on : December 6, 2021 by Carl O'donnell



After a lot happened, I finally got my dream job. But I still feel restless and worry about everything that might go wrong at work. How do I get over this?

Congratulations on your new job. Don't worry, things didn't happen, but be prepared to solve the problems that come your way at work and do the best you can. Nothing is perfect in this world and nothing is smooth in any job. The important thing is to stay calm and think about how to solve problems when they come up. Do not be discouraged by your mistakes or wrong decisions that you have made or will make. They are the learning tools for us on the way to the afterlife. Be positive about yourself and do the best you can. It is everything anyone can ask for anyone.

First congratulations on your dream job.

Now that you have it you have already crossed a milestone of achieving what you always have. I wanted now where the room is for fear of losing.

Rather, you should consider everything you can do to be the best at your job.

Fear of something unknown will not allow you to enjoy what you have earned and will not allow you to perform or exceed what is expected of you in your work.

So drop all your fears and start loving what you have achieved and work hard to reach new heights!

Good luck!

I suggest you read about the law of attraction and how your thinking affects the outcome of your life situations and experiences. Now I will try to point out a few things in relation to your question. If you are focused on the feelings of failure that you are experiencing because you did not get your dream job, then that is what you will receive the most. Disappointment and failure. You attract what you are thinking and, in this case, you will attract more failures. If you focus on how difficult it is to get an interview, you are building resistance to getting an interview and will attract f

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I suggest you read about the law of attraction and how your thinking affects the outcome of your life situations and experiences. Now I will try to point out a few things in relation to your question. If you are focused on the feelings of failure that you are experiencing because you did not get your dream job, then that is what you will receive the most. Disappointment and failure. You attract what you are thinking and, in this case, you will attract more failures. If you focus on how difficult it is to get an interview, you are creating resistance to getting an interview and will attract failure to get one because that is your expectation.

Now I hope this isn't too complicated, but you have to completely revert your thinking to one of imagining how you will feel when you get your dream job and thanking the universe for giving this to you as well. Think about how easy it is to get interviews and how successful you will be until you are offered the job you think you are achieving. Are you starting to get an idea? You get what you think and imagine getting. Think about what you want and not what you don't want. Have you seen the movie "The Secret" that will help you explain what I'm talking about?

Now everything does not end, it only begins for you. The future is yours to create, get out of victim mode and start using the power of positive thinking. Your mind is your best tool to create the life you want, but you are losing the boat. Go to the library and start reading some books on empowering yourself and changing your mind. Read Wayne Dyer, Tony Robbins and Napolean Hill, Bob Proctor and even Marianne Williams. These people are successful and they are no different than you except in the way they think. It is up to you, there is no magic formula, but there is information that will help you. It is up to you, but if you continue to think like you are, you will continue to experience failure, disappointment, and a lack of abundance.

This happened to me just a week ago!

I was lying in bed watching movies with one of my closest friends. It was one of those lazy Sunday mornings where you forget about everything in the world except hot tea on your lap and the fresh smell of your sheets.

I heard my phone vibrate and saw an email notification appear on the screen. I lazily opened my inbox, waiting for some mundane message from one of my email subscriptions.

I took a look at the topic title: 'Job Offer - Company Name'.

My attention was completely captured, then I read the first few words of the email:

'Congratulations. I am delighted

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This happened to me just a week ago!

I was lying in bed watching movies with one of my closest friends. It was one of those lazy Sunday mornings where you forget about everything in the world except hot tea on your lap and the fresh smell of your sheets.

I heard my phone vibrate and saw an email notification appear on the screen. I lazily opened my inbox, waiting for some mundane message from one of my email subscriptions.

I took a look at the topic title: 'Job Offer - Company Name'.

My attention was completely captured, then I read the first few words of the email:

'Congratulations. I'm delighted to ... '

My heart stopped completely.

I held my breath.

Pounding the screen to open the message, I began to read it quickly.

He confirmed that I had landed the job and listed my initial contract details and package inclusions.

So then I fallen in reason. Lasted. My heart came to life and the breath I'd been holding gushed out of me. I started to shake, as a million thoughts raced through my brain in the space of a few seconds.

But all that came out of my mouth was: "OMG." I sat there, completely stunned, repeating those words over and over again.

My friend started hitting me with a pillow. "What? What's going on!"

"I got the job."

I threw myself on top of him and we rolled across the room, screaming with joy.

It was like an adrenaline rush.

I was in shock for the rest of the day, alternating between chest-shattering heart palpitations and a glassy look of bewilderment.

One minute it was a chaos of excitement and the next I was in a dumb stupor.

He had wanted it so bad. He had not eaten or slept properly in weeks, during the long interview process. I didn't even care how much the job was going to pay me. I just knew that I wanted that experience more than anything. It was a unique opportunity and she knew she was ready for it. I have been working towards it for years.

I start in a few weeks!

It depends on your circumstances.

Sometimes dreams take a back seat to reality.

For instance.

If you have children and your current salary is decent and good benefits, following your dreams will have a negative impact on your children.

I have a partner who dreamed of getting a degree and working at a zoo. The closest zoo is a long way from where you live.

He went to college anyway, he went part-time at his job. Has two children. He and his wife made many sacrifices, they struggled financially. Accumulated debt. His children wanted the last things as children do. They had to make do with cheap things, they could never go to hol

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It depends on your circumstances.

Sometimes dreams take a back seat to reality.

For instance.

If you have children and your current salary is decent and good benefits, following your dreams will have a negative impact on your children.

I have a partner who dreamed of getting a degree and working at a zoo. The closest zoo is a long way from where you live.

He went to college anyway, he went part-time at his job. Has two children. He and his wife made many sacrifices, they struggled financially. Accumulated debt. His children wanted the last things as children do. They had to make do with cheap things, they could never go on vacation like their peers.

He finished college and now has a degree. You are now in debt of tens of thousands of pounds with a bad credit rating.

Applied and applied for jobs at the zoo, for jobs anywhere involving animals, etc. Remember the closest zoo is at least a 4 hour trip a day, not great if you have kids.

He was offered a part-time job as a tour guide type role. It's a start. Which is good, at the zoo which is at least 4 hours round trip.

This part-time job wasn't a fixed schedule, it was a zero-hour contract. He took it. The cost of the trip was close enough to what they paid him for a few weeks. Some weeks he got more hours, other weeks no hours.

He kept his part-time job while in college. However, he eventually lost that job because he was unable to meet his work commitments.

But hey, he's living the dream.

Meanwhile, my other partner who worked with him when he started college is now a manager making decent money with great benefits and pension and virtually debt free plus a mortgage who lives in a nice house in a nice area.

So the college buddy lives in a small rented house in a deprived area, struggling to pay the rent.

His wife gave him the option of losing her and their children or getting a full-time job anywhere with low travel costs so they could have some kind of life.

So he gave up his dream. He is still in debt from being in college, etc. But not so much.

They are still renting, but in a better area and a better property.

They are working to improve your credit rating.

His wife and children are happier. He took them on vacation to Spain. He told me it was the best time. His kids loved it, therefore he loved it.

He told me that he wished he had never tried to follow his dream. I wish he had gotten off at work and up, etc., etc.

Sometimes dreams can be unrealistic in real life. And real life is what counts.

But if you lived near a zoo you had virtually no travel costs, maybe things would have been different.

In contrast, my wife's cousin finished college with a degree in zoos, etc. Now he works at a zoo 30 hours a week, not full time, but with guaranteed hours, the money is not great, but it is a start.

The difference is that you live 30 minutes from a large zoo.

Her parents are quite wealthy and they paid all the college bills and extra training etc. She is debt free. His dream is to work in a zoo. But she is lucky, traveling for money, etc. it is not a problem and has no dependents. Your dream is realistic.

Now if my partner's dream was that I didn't know how to hoke Kilimanjaro, then he's a fit guy, that's a fairly affordable realistic dream. If she had a full time job saving money and taking care of her family.

Or if someone is musical and wants to be in a band and release an album. Again, that can be quite realistic, especially today. But again it depends on your personal situation.

My dream was to have a nice house with a garden in a nice area. I achieved that dream. It took me 4 years to sell my flat as in a deprived area I ended up suffering a loss of £ 30,000 on the property to get rid of it. Selling my apartment was my only obstacle. I finally achieved my dream. I am a little poorer but happier. But again it was quite realistic to achieve that dream. My mortgage payments are more, but we can pay them.

People have said don't give up on your dreams. Yes, they are correct but they have a bit of realism.

If Pavarotti was terrible at singing, it would never have made him one of the most famous tenors in history. His dreams came true because he was a natural with immense talent. And often even having that doesn't mean you will make it.

If the sacrifice is too much, think twice.

So this will be very different from my previous answer (which was just being a housewife / wife). I think I actually have my dream job.

I think I want to be a music producer or assistant to a music producer.

I was seeing this:

I love 3Racha. I am definitely a fan. But while looking at this, I really liked the music production.

I have always liked music, I play 4 instruments, I am currently taking blues classes, I understand how music works. I wanted to take rap classes, but I haven't told my parents yet that I can rap. I am quite resourceful

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So this will be very different from my previous answer (which was just being a housewife / wife). I think I actually have my dream job.

I think I want to be a music producer or assistant to a music producer.

I was seeing this:

I love 3Racha. I am definitely a fan. But while looking at this, I really liked the music production.

I have always liked music, I play 4 instruments, I am currently taking blues classes, I understand how music works. I wanted to take rap classes, but I haven't told my parents yet that I can rap. I'm pretty resourceful on a computer, I work better on one than on a phone. I used to write song lyrics (like over 5 years ago. None of that was good) and I used to write poems about my feelings, thoughts and experiences. I wanted to learn how to play drums and how to edit voices. I could start writing poems and lyrics again.

I don't work well with people (by that I mean I wouldn't do well in foodservice, government, or anything else where my job is to deal with people), so sitting in front of a screen , piano, microphone and headphones like me already sound much better. I would love that.

I know this may sound very delusional, but I could work in Kpop ... I'm learning Korean, I can understand a lot already, and sometimes I start to speak it randomly, (laughs) but really with my music and my language skills. , I want to use it for something bigger than school. I don't want to go to school anyway ... that's my only problem. I don't want to go to college, but I could if I want to achieve these things.

I am not interested in school. It bores me, I feel like I'm learning useless things. I don't try to do well in school, I never did. Of course I don't want bad grades, but the thing is, I've never had a bad grade. I have always done well in school and I have done well without even trying. It's just boring. I'm more interested in music and writing. I love writing, I have written many books and I am currently writing one. I have a super active imagination, I have crazy and strange dreams, I am not destined for the real world. Sorry mom, but I don't want a job because I'm busy writing about hot Asian elf men who go on a magical quest and dream of being Spiderman, saving Walmart from burning, and being able to talk to cats ALL AT THE SAME TIME !!!

I have no idea if it would get there (being a music producer), but that's definitely what I want to aim for. I know some music producers who never went to college ... I think I can do it. :)

Bui ~

No ... don't give up now!

I'll tell you my story .. The short version of it.

August 2014, I got tired of my job and couldn't take it anymore. I then announced my resignation and my notice period began. I have a unique combination of skills, so I thought the next might soon.

Couldn't be more wrong. For the next 7 months, I couldn't get a single job. I am married and my son was 8 months old when I submitted my resignation. I came close to getting a job 5 times and all those times, I was informed otherwise after a week of waiting. My wife supported me all the time and never gave up.

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No ... don't give up now!

I'll tell you my story .. The short version of it.

August 2014, I got tired of my job and couldn't take it anymore. I then announced my resignation and my notice period began. I have a unique combination of skills, so I thought the next might soon.

Couldn't be more wrong. For the next 7 months, I couldn't get a single job. I am married and my son was 8 months old when I submitted my resignation. I came close to getting a job 5 times and all those times, I was informed otherwise after a week of waiting. My wife supported me all the time and never gave up. She was employed so we managed every month.

We had plans to celebrate our son's first birthday in a different way. But now we had to settle for what our budget allowed. Now this may not be a big deal for some, but it mattered to us.

Then at the end of January 2015, I received 3 offers from major companies. I chose the one that gave me the opportunity to learn more new things. Now, I am in another country and I am pushing and learning new things every day.

I never gave up, my son made sure I didn't descend into bad thoughts during that period. I took care of him and our father-son bond grew during that time. We had to spend very carefully every month and we could not afford the luxury of any kind, much less the necessities; But I never lost hope

I had help from friends and family financially and with my job search. I suggest you do the same. Improve your resume. Connect with your friends and take advantage of every opportunity. Be clear and keep your spirit.

This too shall pass. So go ahead!

Why are employers reluctant to hire people who haven't worked in years?

In my experience the reason why is what really matters and needs to be addressed proactively.

If I see a resume and the most recent work experience was more than 1 year ago, I am immediately suspicious.

As Lisa Lawson's answer demonstrates, sometimes talented and highly-skilled people take a personal sabbatical to be caregivers, or in some cases, they are dealing with a serious illness (How to Handle a Chemotherapy Gap on Your LinkedIn Profile ), as well as several people. that I have come to know over the years.

But there are also other

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Why are employers reluctant to hire people who haven't worked in years?

In my experience the reason why is what really matters and needs to be addressed proactively.

If I see a resume and the most recent work experience was more than 1 year ago, I am immediately suspicious.

As Lisa Lawson's answer demonstrates, sometimes talented and highly-skilled people take a personal sabbatical to be caregivers, or in some cases, they are dealing with a serious illness (How to Handle a Chemotherapy Gap on Your LinkedIn Profile ), as well as several people. that I have come to know over the years.

But there are other reasons as well, like in a memorable case where someone applying for a job they were hiring for had a 5-year job gap because they were incarcerated.

For these reasons, your resume / CV / LinkedIn profile should address the reason why your work experience is not recent by describing your personal gap year.

Also, most employers have a pro-employment bias - if this person's skills are really good, why hasn't anyone else hired him since? That is the question that every human resource manager will ask. If I put that person against someone who is currently employed, the second person will win 9 times out of 10.

So: they don't know and they come up with an explanation that seems plausible but based on… exactly nothing.

Publish the information, do not allow your candidacy to be the victim of someone else's judgment.

Without context, it is really difficult to write a reasonable answer to this.

Still, let's see what we can do. What you should do depends on where the process is not running:

  1. You submit resumes and never get an answer - here are two things. Either you are losing some important qualification for the job, in which case you are applying for the wrong jobs, or you are qualified but not communicating well. Be sure to research job openings, requirements, and the company you're applying to. Run your resume with your friends and see if they can help you improve it. I wrote a handful of ar
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Without context, it is really difficult to write a reasonable answer to this.

Still, let's see what we can do. What you should do depends on where the process is not running:

  1. You submit resumes and never get an answer - here are two things. Either you are missing some important qualifications for the job, in which case you are applying for the wrong jobs, or you are qualified but not communicating well. Be sure to research job openings, requirements, and the company you're applying to. Run your resume with your friends and see if they can help you improve it. I wrote a handful of articles (https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/your-resume-isnt-working-seppo-helava <- the first, the rest are linked from my profile) about things that a lot of people do wrong in their resumes.
  2. You submit resumes and get a response, and then you interview, but you never pass the interview - this is where it starts to get tricky, because there are many reasons why you might not pass an interview. Perhaps you are not showing that you are technically suited to the position. Maybe it's a personality / behavior issue. It can be very difficult to get honest feedback on your performance in an interview, because in general, giving honest feedback for certain types of interviews can be a legal quagmire for a company. That said, you can sometimes get feedback if you ask politely. If the problems are technical, they will usually tell you. If the problems are "a bad personality", you will probably get comments like "Not exactly what we were looking for"

If you have friends who have jobs, ask them for help. Ask them to do a “mock interview” so you have a chance to practice the process. The interview is a really strange process, because it is nothing like working in a place. Since it is so unnatural, most people have no innate ability for it, and the problems of highly introverted or uncomfortable people are magnified much worse than they would be in a normal work environment.

So it all comes down to if you're not doing interviews, practice with friends and get feedback, practice a little more. Always be courteous. If they turn you down, ask the interviewers for feedback, not the recruiter.

Good luck.

First, job candidates can gain experience for many positions before seeking employment. Volunteer and internship experience counts, so it's best to plan ahead. In addition, internships often lead to job offers.

If an individual does not have the time to gain experience for the job of interest, a job follow-up application can be initiated with another employer. Observed details can be used to substantiate interest in a position through a cover letter. Although job shadowing is often recommended for high school students determining a career field of study, there are certainly no rules.

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First, job candidates can gain experience for many positions before seeking employment. Volunteer and internship experience counts, so it's best to plan ahead. In addition, internships often lead to job offers.

If an individual does not have the time to gain experience for the job of interest, a job follow-up application can be initiated with another employer. Observed details can be used to substantiate interest in a position through a cover letter. Although job tracking is generally recommended for high school students determining a career field of study, there are certainly no rules prohibiting its use later on.

A university, or even a high school student, may request a writing assignment from a professor or teacher that is based on interviewing a person employed in a desired field of interest. Most people are willing to help students and are often flattered when asked for an interview. Questions should be asked about educational readiness, training, skills, and particular job duties. Similar to the job shadowing exercise, the role assignment in the interview can be used to substantiate an interest in a position.

If a candidate has just completed the educational requirements for a position, some employers are more than willing to hire someone with no real work experience. Often this means that a lower salary will be offered. Larger employers may offer mentors to guide and train new hires.

Lastly, positions that do not require a degree generally require on-the-job training after hire. For example, an experienced waitress might be preferred, but would likely be considered a candidate with a friendly personality, good memory, and ability to multitask. The highest paying skilled trades often require only minimal education before or after hiring. Employers hire and sponsor on-the-job apprentices to learn the skilled trades while doing work for pay for the months or years necessary to master a specific trade.

Luck has nothing to do with it; This is how job applicants present themselves. The talent show needs a solid foundation. To that end, the job seeker must have the required level of education, be certified and licensed. Unfortunately, society myopically adheres to the mid-20th century perception that a secondary education is sufficient to enter the workforce, wage gaps are still relatively flat, necessary skills are learned through on-the-job training ; and prosperity is ensured by working the same job for the rest of the workers' lives.

The reality is that cut industrial arts (shop)

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Luck has nothing to do with it; This is how job applicants present themselves. The talent show needs a solid foundation. To that end, the job seeker must have the required level of education, be certified and licensed. Unfortunately, society myopically adheres to the mid-20th century perception that a secondary education is sufficient to enter the workforce, wage gaps are still relatively flat, necessary skills are learned through on-the-job training ; and prosperity is ensured by working the same job for the rest of the workers' lives.

The reality is that eliminating industrial arts classes (workshops) from high schools has resulted in graduates fit for the bottom of the occupational food chain. This is evident from the growing number of community colleges, vocational / technical schools, and career colleges. Job candidate preparation should pick up where general education left off. Apart from the above mentioned, you can learn a specialty by joining the military. However, today's youth are prone to being rejected from military service or other government work due to their indiscretions. Marijuana may be legal in some states, but major employers still follow federal rules and require drug testing. Add to "

When it comes to salary differences, these same high school students delude themselves into believing that after completing minimum education requirements, learning minimal skills, and having no experience, they can name their price. Why else are fast food workers of all people demanding more than double the minimum wage, only to find that they can be replaced by robots? Add to that proven threat, the reality that a growing number of fast food franchises are implementing ordering kiosks. More kiosks, fewer employees. If low-skilled workers want better pay, they need better preparation; thats the reality. Speaking of which, those kiosks won't repair themselves when — not if — they break. Selfless fast food workers will do well to drop picket signs and megaphones, hand spatulas to new hires, and train to repair the works and electronics of such kiosks and robots. The last set of skills definitely pays better than the first.

Then there is the issue of accreditation. Higher-skilled positions, especially in health and technical careers, require candidates to already have certificates or licenses. Some seemingly mundane occupations, such as a manicurist, require a state license, as is required of anyone who makes a living by touching another. Barber, stylist, masseuse, tattoo artist; require licenses from the health department. Information technology workers require certifications from a growing number of industry certification bodies. Even an auto repair shop requires at least one ASE certified mechanic to display the Automotive Service Excellence poster. Healthcare workers must have both industry certifications and state licenses.

Finally, this is not your grandfather's Oldsmobile factory. Sure, when General Dynamics' Convair Division closed in the mid-1990s, an aircraft assembler who had worked there since December 1, 1941, turned off the lights. That was a 54 or 55 year old record. The modern workplace no longer offers that job security. Workers must learn new skills, sign up when the company offers volunteer training, be willing to step out of their comfort zone, and apply for the next higher position whenever possible. Although a market economy does not offer guaranteed employment, skilled workers can protect themselves from job cuts by asking for greater responsibility, developing new skills, and seeking an education.

Well, you will have to be honest about your work situation.

Is it really a dream job if your boss sucks, you can't keep up, and you feel unmotivated and worthless at work?

This sounds to me like the textbook definition of the worst job you can have. This is not a definition of your dream job.

I have had many different jobs. The best jobs I've usually had were in companies or divisions where the boss was a good boss that I could get along with and where I felt like a vital member of the team. What I did was part of it, but the work environment was a big part of what made the job a good j

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Well, you will have to be honest about your work situation.

Is it really a dream job if your boss sucks, you can't keep up, and you feel unmotivated and worthless at work?

This sounds to me like the textbook definition of the worst job you can have. This is not a definition of your dream job.

I have had many different jobs. The best jobs I've usually had were in companies or divisions where the boss was a good boss that I could get along with and where I felt like a vital member of the team. What I did was part of that, but the work environment was a big part of what made the job a good job.

One of the worst jobs I ever had was a job that I thought would be my dream job. I couldn't do anything right. It became a nightmare. What I did was what I wanted to do, but the rest was horrible.

I think you have to review what you consider to be a dream job, why you think this particular job is, and why you are willing to tolerate such brutal conditions and an unhappy spouse if you decide that this IS what you want to do. If it is the duties or the responsibility of the job profile, then surely you can find a company that does a similar job where the environment is not so nightmare.

But if you think this job is worth all this stress and unhappiness, you really need to think about why you are willing to put up with misery at home and in a job like this. Are you afraid to admit that you may have made a mistake when you took this job?

Like I said, I also had a job like this. The hardest part WAS admitting that I didn't fit in well, that I had misjudged my ability to do the job, and that I was unfit for this job. We all make mistakes, it is not a crime to try something and not be successful.

I think if you find another job, the rest of your problems will take care of themselves. Your husband is probably upset that you work late, you feel miserable when you are home, and he is frustrated by you or tired of your bad mood when you get home.

A better job will probably mean a better home life, not to mention a better person.

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